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1899 – House at Walsall, Staffordshire

Architect: Newton & Cheatle

0002

“The house illustrated by us has just been erected for Mr. W. E. Blyth, J. P., on the Highgate-road, about one mile from Walsall. It is situated on the slope of a hill, with the principal rooms at the back commanding an attractive and extensive view across the valley, with the Beacon Hills in the distance. Immediately below are the formal gardens, arranged in terraces, with the tennis lawn at the bottom. The house is entered by an overhanging porch into a large galleried hall, with staircase starting from a central position and winding round.

The ingle has been contrived under the stairs, with open panelling and specially designed leaded lights. The hall will have a wax-polished wood-block floor, and is so arranged as to form an easy connection to the three principal rooms without destroying its value as a habitable room if required. The drawingroom will have a floor of oak boards in narrow widths, and will be stained and wax polished ; the ceilings have moulded plaster cornices and ribs. The room is divided into two parts by an archway, supported on square taper columns, moulded caps and bases. By this arrangement the smaller room maybe converted into a boudoir, and will have direct communication with the conservatory. The dining-room will have a stained-wood cornice and ribs, and a comfortable and roomy ingle nook, with windows overlooking the terraces and tennis lawn. The space above the ingle has been fitted with casements glazed with leaded lights, and forms a convenient place for the storage of curios, \’c. The kitchens’and pantries have been so arranged as to form a back hall, which acts as a servery from kitchen and dining-room, thus avoiding the objectionable cross traffic. The bed and dressing rooms are all arranged on the first floor, with the exception of one attic. The whole of the internal fittings have been designed in a plain and simple style, suitable to the homely character of the house.” Perspective view & plans as published in The Building News, August 18th 1899.