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June 8, 2010

Canadian Pavilion – Shanghai Expo 2010

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The design and construction of the Canada Pavilion is intended to reflect Canadian values of inclusivity, sustainability, and creativity. This three-story structure is the product of collaboration between the Government of Canada and Cirque du Soleil, with building expertise from SNC Lavalin. Among the largest pavilions at Expo 2010, the Canada Pavilion is destined to provide each visitor with a glimpse of life in a Canadian urban centre.

The curved design creates a large public space that encourages interaction and a community feeling. An angled accessible ramp invites visitors beyond the interior courtyard into the pavilion. Entertainment in the courtyard and on video screens located along the waiting area encourages interaction among the visitors and echoes a lively urban gathering place.

The exterior skin of the pavilion is composed of 4000 m2 of Canadian red cedar, certified by the Canada Wood Association and Canada Wood China. This is an important sustainable aspect of the design. The cedar boards are individually fastened to a steel frame, which allows easy dismantling so the wood can be reused in construction projects following Expo 2010.

A 15 metre by 40 metre green wall of evergreen seedlings is a backdrop to the courtyard entertainment. In addition to illustrating a universal desire for green space in urban centres, the green wall also operates as a natural bio air filter. Green walls of similar design can be found in cities across Canada including Montréal and Vancouver.
Interior

The interior of the pavilion comprises three floors. The first floor is the public presentation, which reflects Canada’s theme “The Living City: inclusive, sustainable, creative.” A unique conference centre and visitors’ lounge occupy the second floor. This space will be used for events, meetings and presentations on trade, investment, and educational opportunities in Canada. Finally, the third floor houses operations and administration to ensure the smooth functioning of pavilion programs.