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Architecture of Dublin City

23 March 2013

1910 – Woolworth’s, Grafton St., Dublin

Architect: O’Callaghan & Webb The first F. W. Woolworth store in Ireland opened in 1914 on Grafton Street in Dublin. Eventually spread over three adjacent commercial units. The southernmost was No.101, a solid...

17 August 2015

1911 – Consumptives Pavilion, Royal Hospital for Incurables, Donnybrook

Architect: Kaye-Parry & Ross Winning design in an architectural competition to design a hospital building for Consumptives at the Royal Hospital for Incurables in Dublin. Kaye-Parry & Ross carried out other alterations to...

01 April 2010

1911 – Former Todd Burns, Mary Street, Dublin

Architect: C.B. Powell Like the larger store (now Pennys) across the street, this attractive piece of commercial architecture was built for Todd Burns. Now a facade to a shopping centre.

17 September 2009

1911 – Hick’s Tower, Dublin

Architect: Frederick G. Hicks

18 February 2010

1911 – Nos.60-61 South Great George’s Street, Dublin

Architect: Edwin Bradbury A fine pair of commercial buildings with ornate upper stories. No. 61, on the right was rebuilt by Edwin Bradbury in 1911.

10 February 2010

1911 – The International Bar, Wicklow Street, Dublin

Architect: George L. O’Connor

07 April 2010

1912 – Institute of Technology, Bolton Street, Dublin

Architect: C.J. McCarthy This palatial building in red brick and Mountcharles Sandstone was designed by the City Architect Charles J. McCarthy and was built between 1909-12. McCarthy was the son of leading Victorian...

27 March 2012

1912 – Liffey Bridge Gallery Proposal, Dublin

Architect: Sir Edwin Lutyens Intended to house the collection of Sir Hugh Lane, and to replace the Wellington Bridge (Ha’penny Bridge,) Lutyens design was rejected by the city corporation. Lane was keen to...

17 February 2010

1912 – Nos.102-3 Grafton Street, Dublin

Architect: W.H. Byrne & Son Originally constructed for West & Son, in a style heavily influenced by Richard Norman Shaw’s work in England. Described as having a “Louis XVI interior”.

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