Twitter Facebook Vimeo Youtube Google Plus Pinterest Tumblr

Architecture of Toronto

11 December 2009

1876 – St Andrews Presbyterian Church, Toronto, Ontario

Architect: William G. Storm / S.G. Curry St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church is located on King St. at Simcoe. It was designed by architect George Storm (also known as William G. Storm) who also...

11 December 2009

1884 – St Andrew By-The-Lake, Toronto, Ontario

Architect: Arthur R. Denison The moving force behind the construction of this island church was Reverend Arthur Sweatman who later became Archbishop of Toronto, and Primate of All Canada [1907 - 1909]. The...

11 December 2009

1886 – Hockey Hall of Fame (Former Bank of Montreal), Toronto, Ontario

Architect: Darling & Curry Designed in 1885-86 to replace a building that was not yet thirty years old, because it was not grand enough for the aspirations of the Bank of Montreal, and...

30 September 2009

1889 – Upper Canada College, Toronto, Ontario

Architect: George Durand

01 October 2009

1891 – Aged Womans Home, Toronto, Ontario

Architect: B.R. Gregg

11 December 2009

1892 – Gooderham Building, Toronto, Ontario

Architect: David Roberts Jr. The building was commissioned by George Gooderham to house the head offices of his Gooderham & Worts distilling company. Wedged into the confluence of Wellington and Front Street East,...

11 December 2009

1892 – Ontario Legislature, Toronto, Ontario

Architects: Richard A. Waite In the mid-1880s a fashion for American architecture brought the style of Boston architect Henry Hobson Richardson north. Known as Richardsonian Romanesque, the style featured massive blocks of rough-hewn...

29 August 2013

1892 – Toronto Board of Trade Building. Yonge St., Toronto

Architect: James & James Designed by the American architectural firm of James & James of New York City, and closely resembled the appearance of the Board of Trade Building in Boston, Mass., which...

02 August 2010

1894 – Armouries, Toronto

Architect: Thomas Fuller In the late 1800s, the federal government realized that they needed to provide their volunteer soldiers with centralized locations for training, and decided to construct the Toronto Armouries. Architect Thomas...