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Architecture of Louth

07 January 2010

1734 – Barlow House, Drogheda, Co. Louth

Architect: Richard Cassels or Francis Bindon A fine mid eighteenth century built by Alderman James Barlow. With five bays on three floors and a basement, it is a substantial Georgian residence. It has...

07 January 2010

1740 – The Alleys, Drogheda, Co. Louth

Behind St Peter’s Church of Ireland are these attractive houses built as a refuge for widows of clergy. There are four terraces of houses, each house of four bays and two storeys. The...

07 January 2010

1752 – St. Peter’s Church of Ireland, Drogheda, Co. Louth

Architect: Hugh Darley Built on the site of an earlier church, St Peters is a fabulous example of a Georgian church. It has been described as “probably the finest provincial Georgian church in...

07 January 2010

1765 – Mayoralty House, Drogheda, Co. Louth

Architect: Hugh Darley An important civic building at the time of its construction, the Mayoralty House has been in use as a commercial premises for decades. Built of limestone ashlar with trimmings of...

07 January 2010

1770 – Tholsel, Drogheda, Co. Louth

Architect: George Darley / W.H. Byrne Used for over one hundred years as a bank branch, the Tholsel is a stern and forbidding building in appearance. It is a tall and narrow building,...

09 March 2013

1785 – Rokeby Hall, Dunleer, Co. Louth

Architect: Thomas Cooley Designs for Rokeby Hall by Thomas Cooley but supervised by Francis Johnston after his death, for Richard Robinson, Archbishop of Armagh. Robinson has previously hired both Cooley and Johnston for...

07 January 2010

1796 – The Corn Exchange, Drogheda, Co. Louth

Architect: Francis Johnston Originally designed by Francis Johnston who lived in Drogheda from 1786 to 1793 while working on a commission from Primate Robinson. This building today houses Drogheda’s council offices. It is...

06 January 2010

1800 – Abbeyview House, Carlingford, Co. Louth

Fine house, sympathetically extended around 1900, with ornate central doorway and large window openings. The door surround is particularly notable and offers a focal point to the fa├žade.

07 January 2010

1807 – St Mary’s Church of Ireland, Drogheda, Co. Louth

A simple First Fruits church from 1807, with a three bay nave with pointed windows with Y tracery. It has a rectangular sanctuary at the eastern end. The tower is of three stages...