Aierlan

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  • in reply to: McDonalds Building Grafton Street #741213

    Aierlan
    Participant

    I was asking about this building last year (I was looking for an early photo but I didn’t find one). It used to be Mitchell’s restaurant/cafe, up until the early 1950s. Mitchell’s are now wine merchants and their shop is on Kildare Street.

    If you look at a bag from the wine shop, it says founded in 1805 so I presume they were the original owners of the building on Grafton Street.

    I don’t know what happened in 1927 but you might find out if you ask in the wine shop.

  • in reply to: Cap on retail space #735337

    Aierlan
    Participant

    Originally posted by sw101
    ikea could operate in stores under the cap limit, surely they’re just pushing their luck.

    I’d rather have an IKEA that stocked their full range, had plenty of display space and was comfortable to navigate.

    the idea that ikeas “quality, design and value” would somehow benefit irish businesses is ludicrous.

    Why? This is the whole theory behind competitive markets. Irish businesses either compete with IKEA on these points, find some other competitve advantage (e.g. bespoke furniture) or get out of the business.

    I have visited perhaps every furniture store in Dublin and Navan over the last year and it has been a miserable experience (there have been odd pockets of excellence, however). I have previously lived in several countries with IKEA stores and there is no comparison. As consumers, we are just hurting ourselves by not allowing a company operating to IKEA’s standards to locate here.

  • in reply to: Cap on retail space #735335

    Aierlan
    Participant

    Originally posted by Graham Hickey
    It would appear that IKEA are the only ones that need the large retail space – under no circumstances should legislation be passed to satisfy a single private interest.

    The change would not be to satisfy IKEA’s private interest but to meet the needs of Irish consumers. IKEA offer a level of quality, design and value that is not matched in Ireland today. Irish retailers and the Irish public would all benefit from seeing how things can be done.

    WalMart, on the other hand, I don’t want to see for all the reasons you mentioned. Can we have one and not the other?

  • in reply to: Metro #731739

    Aierlan
    Participant

    It’s pretty common in other countries to have to walk a fair distance underground to connect between different rail systems.

    It might seem quite far on the surface between O’Connell Street and Connolly or D’Olier Street and Tara but it would seem much closer underground with level walkways, travelators, lack of weather and so on.

    The spread of some underground stations abroad can be astounding but they are perceived as being quite localised because a single station name covers several platforms and many exits.

    Examples that come to mind would be T-Centralen (subway)/ Central Station (mainline rail) in Stockholm (link) and Central (subway) / Hong Kong Station (airport line) in Hong Kong (link – all that brown and grey shaded area).

  • in reply to: Art Deco #725508

    Aierlan
    Participant

    I have often stood at the bus stop on Kildare Street admiring the entrance to the Department of Enterprise, Trade and Employment.

    It’s not often remarked upon but it’s an Art Deco gem.

  • in reply to: What is "good architecture" #725083

    Aierlan
    Participant

    Originally posted by J. Seerski
    What do people think of UCD in Belfield? (in archictectural terms only!)

    Joke or good architecture? The arts block is very functional – but would it be regarded as a fine work?

    Is the arts block functional? I always found it difficult to navigate. It’s a sure indicator of poor design if you have to tack on a system of lines painted on the floor and giant letters hanging from the ceiling just to get people around.

    As for the rest of UCD, during my time as a student there I never found much to elevate the spirit, architecturally speaking. I enjoyed my days in Earlsfort Terrace more, where I also took classes.

    One thing in Belfield I liked was the covered walkways. I don’t know why that idea is not used more in this rainy country.

    I also liked the Engineering block with its naturally well-lit atrium built around a salvaged beam engine. The office corridors are dark though.

    Taking a wider design perspective, Belfield is still very poorly served by public transport.

  • in reply to: Yuck!!! #724396

    Aierlan
    Participant

    How about the stunningly ugly Rhode power station?

    (Picture is a bit small, sorry.)

  • in reply to: Help! Malton / Champs D’ Elysees #724367

    Aierlan
    Participant

    How much would you be willing to spend?

    The Irish Prints of James Malton

  • in reply to: Help! Malton / Champs D’ Elysees #724362

    Aierlan
    Participant

    Originally posted by Graham Hickey
    What I really also need is a watercolour/picture of City Hall/Royal Exchange from the late 18th or early 19th century. I’ve never seen any image of it by Malton.

    It exists anyway (see here). I don’t know if you can find this in Dublin but Barnes & Noble will ship to Ireland.

  • in reply to: O’Connell Bridge House #724157

    Aierlan
    Participant

    Originally posted by StephenC
    There is a current recladding project going on at the top of Pearse Street – beside the GArda Station. It was an ugly concrete clad 60’s yoke… any ideas or pics as to what it will end up like. I thinks its called Joyce House.

    That would be Goldsmith House. It has really been stripped back to a shell.

    I pulled this off the OPW site:

    This six-story office development constructed in 1975 is State owned and is located at one of the busiest traffic junctions in the city. Work in connection with its complete refurbishment both externally and internally commenced in June 2002 and are due for completion in June 2003.

    The existing building has been stripped back to the concrete frame and is to be reclad using stone and feature glazing with modern performance glass. The new zinc roof incorporates two new floors (727m) with a set back penthouse.

    The office space has been completely modernised with suspended ceilings, raised access floors and the provision of mechanical ventilation throughout. The new training centre will be located on the ground floor and will have five training rooms.

  • in reply to: Mitchell’s of Grafton Street #724200

    Aierlan
    Participant

    Originally posted by Paul Clerkin
    Hadnt heard? They only have a link on every page of the archeire website. Honestly I reckon you lot never look at the main site 😉

    “archeire” – what’s that? 🙂

    Seriously though, if you don’t put it in 24-point flashing red letters, how am I going to notice it???

  • in reply to: Mitchell’s of Grafton Street #724198

    Aierlan
    Participant

    Originally posted by trace
    Check out the boxes of photographs (filed by county and, for Dublin, by street) in the reading room of the Irish Architectural Archive, 73 Merrion Square.

    Sounds promising! I hadn’t heard of that organisation before. I see they have a website. Next time I have a day off work, I’ll pay them a visit.

    Thanks for the suggestions so far!

  • in reply to: Mitchell’s of Grafton Street #724197

    Aierlan
    Participant

    Originally posted by notjim
    have you tried the irish historical picture shop on ormonde quay?

    I did. It sells reproductions from the National Library collection.

    Great range of photos from around the country but I felt the reproduction quality was not as high as it could have been.

  • in reply to: Ha’ penny Bridge #724117

    Aierlan
    Participant

    How about a Singapore-style ban on the sale of chewing gum for 6 months? Just to impress on the citizenry that gum is a nuisance if not disposed of properly.

    And a flogging for anyone caught bringing a few sticks into the country.

  • in reply to: Technology & designing process #724076

    Aierlan
    Participant

    I’d say Norman Foster is what happens when you have computers generating curves, calculating stresses and modelling aerodynamics. For example:

    Swiss Re
    City Hall

  • in reply to: Rebuilding Old City parts #724020

    Aierlan
    Participant

    I worked inside that building for a few months once (about 11 years ago, I think). It’s funny, I have no memory of the foyer at all. I do recall long, anonymous corridors.

    There are some structures on the top of the building that you wouldn’t really notice from ground level. These include the National Control Centre for electricity generation in Ireland. That part is in quite a different style – a more modern interior.

    There is rather a good view of Dublin from the roof – it’s higher than most other buildings. The ESB takes (or used to take anyway) advantage of this for line-of-sight microwave links to other spots around Dublin.

    The outside I always thought severe. Since it is on a block by itself, I don’t feel that moving it would help.

  • in reply to: Rebuilding Old City parts #724013

    Aierlan
    Participant

    It seems to me that any nod towards the past gets derided as pastiche by the architectural critics. Despite the fact that people generally like the proportions of old Dublin buildings, the brickwork and the exterior detailing, when a gap gets filled in we always seem to end up with huge sheets of metal, levitating slabs of stone, windows at odd angles and so on.

    My question, I suppose, is could you get any architect to suppress his/her desire for critical approbation long enough to work on such a restoration project.

    I’m not an architect myself and perhaps that’s unfair to the profession. But I do wonder why numerous examples of great design (in my eyes) are ignored when creating new buildings.

  • in reply to: we’re all hip and cool and Rocha #723933

    Aierlan
    Participant

    I made some comments on this topic recently on my weblog. That was following a seminar on Swedish design held in Dublin a week or so ago.

    You might find the links useful.

  • in reply to: North Dublin City to get Legal Quarter #723973

    Aierlan
    Participant

    This could become quite an attraction if we can persuade the beaks and barristers to hoof it from bar to bar (so to speak) in their horsehair and silks.

  • in reply to: Why Dublin should be proud. #723846

    Aierlan
    Participant

    Just to note… that review of Dublin is part of the Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy which happens to be hosted by the BBC.

    The BBC does not create the content – people all over the world do. You can contribute yourself, if you register.

    The Dublin article was written by somebody living in Dublin, possibly a native, I can’t tell.

Viewing 20 posts - 1 through 20 (of 22 total)

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