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Castletown House – Folly

This topic contains 5 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  Anonymous 9 years, 6 months ago.

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  • #707651

    kefu
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    What do you all make of this [below]? A disgrace in my book – you think when these things pass into State ownership, their future is secure.
    They could do with spending a few quid on the Wellington Monument while they’re at it – the bronze features at the base have been very badly vandalised.

    205. Mr. Durkan asked the Minister for Finance if any action is proposed or intended in respect of Connolly’s Folly, Maynooth, County Kildare, which is showing serious signs of deterioration; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [4295/05]

    Minister of State at the Department of Finance (Mr. Parlon): I confirm that lightning protection was installed recently to protect the folly and that the condition of the folly continues to be monitored. In the event of any essential repairs being required, these will be undertaken. In addition, consideration is being given to the provision of a CCTV security system around the folly to combat vandalism.

    However, as indicated in replies to similar questions from the Deputy on the same issue, I confirm that major works are not planned for Connolly’s Folly at this time.

    #750952

    ewanduffy
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    I remember when you could still get up to the central platform through the door in the left hand arch. Of course, the compo culture has put long since put paid to that. :(

    #750953

    GrahamH
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    Ooh I’d give my right arm to climb up there (probably do so in the process anyway). Never actually seen the Folly up close :(
    As the symbol not only for Castletown, and the IGS, but for the conservation movement as a whole in Ireland, it deserves better treatment than this, let alone on its own merits.
    It’s such a hauntingly beautiful structure it’s a pity more people don’t get to see it, but it’s going to be some years before it’s finally made a bit more accessible with the estate walks etc that I believe are being planned.

    Anyone know anything about this development – from last week’s IT Property:

    476 homes for site near Wonderful Barn
    Fiona Tyrrell

    A plan to build over 450 houses in the vicinity of one of Ireland’s more unusual historical landmarks has been lodged with Kildare County Council.

    Developer David Daly’s Albany Homes is seeking to build 476 houses on lands at Barnhall in Leixlip in the grounds of the Wonderful Barn, a stone grain store, dating from 1743 and Barnhall House dating from the 17th century.

    The wonderful barn is a folly built by Lady Laura Catherine Connolly as a poverty relief project during the Famine. Based on the design of an Indian rice store, the seven-storey structure had a practical use as a grain store.

    Visible from the M4 motorway, the grain store is one of only two in the country, according to the National Inventory of Architectural Heritage. It is located on a 90-acre site which was rezoned for housing in March 2002 by Kildare County Council. Under a local area action plan, the council decided that 48 acres of the site would be dedicated as parkland and 42 acres would be developed as low to medium-density housing.

    A landscaping plan for the site includes provision of a bank of trees to screen the new housing from the historical buildings. Plans for restoring a walled garden have also been made. The transfer of the Barn complex – including Barnhall House, the Wonderful Barn, two dovecotes and walled garden and the remaining parkland – is being negotiated by the council.

    Albany Homes, which purchased the land from a consortium of landowners in 2004, is seeking permission to build 122 four-bed houses, 12 three-bed houses, 136 two-bed houses, a crèche and two shops on the site. All proposed residential units are two-storeys in height.

    The council’s area action plan for the site was described as “disastrous” by the Hon Desmond Guinness, former president of the Irish Georgian Society. Lands surrounding the barn, he said, “should be kept free of housing development” to protect its setting.

    © The Irish Times

    #750954

    Anonymous
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    @Graham Hickey wrote:

    The council’s area action plan for the site was described as “disastrous” by the Hon Desmond Guinness, former president of the Irish Georgian Society. Lands surrounding the barn, he said, “should be kept free of housing development” to protect its setting.

    There should never have been an action area plan, the property should have passed into goverment ownership or if we had a properly funded National Trust.

    #750955

    GrahamH
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    Would the State have had to stump up millions though for what would have been ‘prime dvelopment land’?
    Not that it shouldn’t have been protected in the first place, either via zoning or otherwise.

    The estates encircling Celbridge are really awful, rows upon rows of semi-ds, all laid out along those ubiquitous mini dual-carriageways with the little roundabouts for accessing the next row of housing – as boring as I don’t know what, it really has to be seen to be believed, whatever about the many other implications of such development.
    And it’s a shame because Celbridge is such a lovely historic town at its centre – it’s only when you move further out that it gradually gets worse.

    #750956

    Anonymous
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    @Graham Hickey wrote:

    Would the State have had to stump up millions though for what would have been ‘prime dvelopment land’?
    Not that it shouldn’t have been protected in the first place, either via zoning or otherwise.

    Prime argicultural land prior to the latest development plan, i.e €20k per acre or €2m,

    Councillors in this country rarely if ever have sufficient time to consider rezonings

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