Grafton Street, Dublin

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  • #784759

    Anonymous

    Here’s the full thing…

    Experts say special Grafton Street planning restrictions won’t work
    Gretchen Friemann

    Planning&Development: Special planning restrictions aimed at reversing the spread of mobile phone shops and convenience stores along Grafton Street are likely to backfire, according to a number of landlords and property experts.

    Two weeks ago Dublin City Council (DCC) proposed transforming the capital’s main shopping thoroughfare into an architectural conservation area (ACA) following mounting concerns over the street’s deteriorating character.

    The new planning designation will give the local authority strict control over what types of businesses can trade from the street and it’s expected that mobile phone shops, convenience stores and pharmacies will be among those retailers that are in future either limited or excluded from the prime shopping thoroughfare.

    But property experts claim such interference in the market is counter-productive.

    They argue that restricting certain retailers from acquiring leases simply “incentivises” the current undesirable occupiers to remain trading on the street and creates an unpredictable market dynamic.

    The fear is that under the ACA, leasehold values on certain properties will shoot through the roof making it harder for new, more attractive retailers to gain a foothold on the thoroughfare.

    For example, mobile phone companies pay top rents for their outlets but, if special planning restrictions limit their numbers, then their existing leaseholds become a scarce commodity. That means any retailer looking to buy-out the lease has to fork-out key money significantly above the going market rate. And, according to Stephen Murray, head of retail at Jones Lang LaSalle, “restricted” companies – like the mobile phone shops – could then be faced with “reverse premiums” if the leaseholds were impossible to sell at the adjusted value. In other words, the blacklisted retailer would have to pay another user to take over the terms of the lease if it wanted to exit the street.

    Murray argues that since few companies would agree to such a transaction, given the stratospheric rental terms they currently trade under, the ACA would “ironically be preserving” Grafton Street’s retail mix rather than enhancing it.

    However, Dick Gleeson, head of planning at Dublin City Council, maintains the special planning restrictions will improve the area’s appeal by offering easier access to certain retailers.

    Over the past few years supply constraints on Grafton Street have blocked the arrival of international fashion houses and Gleeson claims the ACA will ensure new traders are of a “quality and standard” that is appropriate for Ireland’s most famous shopping location.

    If the scheme is adopted as an amendment to the city development plan by the end of the year, as Dublin City Council hopes it will be, landlords and tenants will no longer be able to award a lease to the highest bidder.

    Instead the local authority will have the final say over what retailers can occupy Grafton Street.

    A list of “difficult users” will be compiled, identifying retailers that are banned from the thoroughfare and specifying other users that are only allowed in limited numbers.

    But, as property experts point out, Dublin City Council does not have a successful track record in controlling city centre retailing. Seven years ago the Ann Summers sex shop chain won its battle to open an outlet on O’Connell Street after it challenged the local authorities in the High Court.

    Some property experts argue the Grafton Street ACA could precipitate similar legal disputes.

    They also claim the mobile phone shops, convenience stores and pharmacies which have been at the centre of an increasingly bitter debate about Grafton Street’s tarnished image would have been flushed out by the forces of the free market.

    Hugh Linehan, head of property with Hibernian Investments, which owns six shops on the thoroughfare, insists the mobile phone outlets are temporary traders, more concerned with marketing than clocking up sales.

    “It’s difficult to imagine they can reconcile these high rents with the number of products they are selling. I think this is all about maintaining a high-profile image.”

    And he claims retailers, like the phone shops, will inevitably relocate as the demand for space increases from other users.

    Yet it is this constant churn that has most incensed local politicians and lobby groups, such as the Dublin City Business Organisation. They blame the institutional funds, which own large chunks of property along Grafton Street, for mismanaging the area and undermining its appeal to the general public.

    Over the past 12 months more than half a dozen shops have changed hands, most of them prompted by rent reviews where landlords have pushed for leases to increase to the latest Zone A benchmark.

    It is the highest churn rate in 20 years and has almost culled the street of indigenous retailers.

    However, Niall Gaffney, the investments director with IPUT, a property pension fund which owns five outlets on the thoroughfare, including the O2 Experience shop, insists Grafton Street’s problems could be solved by developing the surrounding area.

    “Henry Street really is stealing a march on Grafton Street at the moment because it has large-scale sites that can accommodate key tenants, like Arnotts and Roches Stores. So the most effective way to improve the retail mix on the southside is to offer more space and that means developing the large landbanks that surround Grafton Street.

    “They’re going some way to address this supply crunch with the South King Street and South Anne Street schemes but we need the local authorities to concentrate their efforts on encouraging more of these developments.”

    And he pointed out “you don’t attract big name retailers by slapping down ACAs. How many have moved into O’Connell Street as a result of similar planning restrictions? Henry Street proves the only way to attract these companies is by providing high-quality, large-scale units.”

    ร‚ยฉ The Irish Times

    #784760

    admin
    Keymaster

    Thanks for that Cobalt and how revealing it was to ๐Ÿ˜‰

    Gretchen should have her brief/future with the IT seriously considered after that article;

    #784761

    Anonymous
    Thomond Park wrote:
    ] Eh??:confused:
    #784762

    Anonymous

    While Grafton Street maybe Dublins busiest street, it has a lower spend per user than that of Henry Street.

    Grafton Street serves two main purposes: as a main shopping street and as a main pedestrian thouroughfare linking the city to St. Stephens Green and its associated office district. As such many of the users are simply going somewhere else.

    However Henry Street is more of a shopping Street than Grafton Street. It is not used as a thouroughfare in the sense that Grafton Street: it is not a link to any major business or commercial district. People mostly use Henry Street as a shopping destination.

    Is there not a contradiction in DCC seeking to improve the street by discouraging certain retailers but being interested in attracting Zara and its ilk? Surely this would accelerate the decline from a unique and high class shopping destination to a monotonous ‘high street’ repeated ad nauseum throughout Britain? In attempting to get Zara etc, it would involve knocking some of the smaller units together – destroying the variety of stores on offer on the street.

    Over the past century, once prosperous thouroughfares became economic backwaters and similarly once ignored streets became dominant retail districts. In the 1950s, O’Connell, Sth. Gt Georges and Thomas Streets vied with Henry Street and Grafton Street for attracting the mass of shoppers. Given the increasing attractiveness of Georges Street and Liffey Street for shoppers, may we be seeing other streets eclipsing the tired and jaded established retail core?

    #784763

    Anonymous

    looks like i got what i was looking for, although on a much smaller scale:D
    a television screen advertising smart telecom has been erected just under the budweiser sign on the top of grafton. Its my hope that this area will evolve into dublins time square/piccadilly circus… ๐Ÿ˜ฎ well not that cluttered as it is a small area, but i think a larger screen or two would suit. how does everyone else feel about screens in the city???

    #784764

    Anonymous

    @ihateawake wrote:

    looks like i got what i was looking for, although on a much smaller scale:D
    a television screen advertising smart telecom has been erected just under the budweiser sign on the top of grafton. Its my hope that this area will evolve into dublins time square/piccadilly circus… ๐Ÿ˜ฎ well not that cluttered as it is a small area, but i think a larger screen or two would suit. how does everyone else feel about screens in the city???

    I feel that you should shoot yourself ? Times square is kind of cool,but the billboards are simply hiding ugly buildings. Piccadilly circus is a cesspool of muck that makes temple bar look rarefied. It fails utterly to recreate the buzz of times square.Theres a place for garish lighting and tv billboards but it’s not on grafton street. i’m not sure we have somewhere that would suit. The newer buildings facing temple bar square would work, but that would cement temple bar as the dungeon of booze.The building to the east of the central bank (facing dame street ) might be an appropriate place . But on the whole it’s just a bad idea. Null points.

    #784765

    Anonymous

    :p Harsh, i dont think the area should be covered with them, but as the center of dublins commercial lifestyle, i think a little modernisation wouldnt hurt. The corner building over bus stop was certainly ugly enough to completely cover with that giant blue “Manpower” ad for a week or two. The old style buildings add class, I think, but not with a scrap metal budweiser sign and other ads hanging off them, I think they should take the ads down, or make them uniform and neat(a screen). The point village seems like it would be an ideal place.

    #784766

    Anonymous

    @ihateawake wrote:

    :Harsh

    Sorry! sarcasm just comes across as rudeness through de wonderfuul mediam ov de tinternett. My experience of times squares is that it works as it is an area full , no bursting , with theatres and “eateries” and such. I think that’s why The lighting on Piccadilly doesn’t work : there just aren’t enough places like theatres and cinemas . Piccadilly happens to have lots of people going by that’s all.It has no buzz at all. Grafton street would be the same. That’s why i suggested the square in temple bar , but there again no .Because i don’t think that would look quite right. The point village maybe , i’m not sure though. The top of liffey street , maybe the side of the central bank that faces dame street ( that might be cool , as the screens would be angled towards the ground). Maybe on the pedestrian area leading to talbot street from o’connell street .

    #784767

    Anonymous

    Np, I like sarcasm, once I cop onto it:D You’re right about piccadilly having no buzz, I suppose grafton is similar. Seems there is a large temporary screen fitted in the square in temple bar every year… http://www.eyecandymediapartners.com/press/stpatricksday_dublin2006/

    Mabey they should strap one to the spire

    #784768

    Anonymous

    Heinous as it might sound , i really really like the the spike. Especially at night.Wait maybe it’s a great idea ! The next time right wing nationalists go a marching down the liberator’s street we could display the level of support for their cause. Or flash nuggets of history onto the screen. I really like to see the reaction of a load of these loonies to “Robert Emmet was a prod , and so was Wolf Tone” scrolling across a big screen.

    #784769

    Anonymous

    heh, the poor telly wouldnt work too well with รขโ€šยฌ50,000 worth of street lodged in it

    #784770

    Anonymous

    Why not fly a blimp over the city, with a huge screen displaying news, information and advertisments? It’d be a huge attraction “There’s the famous Dublin blimp!” they’d say.

    #784771

    Anonymous

    The Harp building would be a great place for a big sparkly screen.

    #784772

    Anonymous

    I just feel that screens and flashy advertising look better in an area of height and scale, not to mention modernity. Highrise buildings or skyscrapers would reduce the impact and in a way make the dazzling signs seem somewhat more fitting. In a low rise street like Grafton, which is narrow and has much historic architecture a concentration of Time Square type advertising would look garishly out of place.

    There’s a screen tacked onto an old building in Shaftesbury Square in Belfast. It disfigures the Victorian(?) architecture and so looks a bit ridiculous. However, as the area is quite large and has already been fill with architectural crap over the past few decades it seems slightly less obtrusive than might have been the case.

    #784773

    Anonymous

    Yes, O’Connell House would be a good spot. The bridge and Westmorland St will be rid of cars soon anyway.

    Or how about BOI on college green? Perfect! ๐Ÿ˜‰

    #784774

    Anonymous

    Are they thinking of putting up a permament sign ??

    #784775

    Anonymous

    @maskhadov wrote:

    Are they thinking of putting up a permament sign ??

    no no ihateawake was just fantasising , it’s ok though i sent some hitmen to rough him up .

    #784776

    Anonymous

    @ihateawake wrote:

    looks like i got what i was looking for, although on a much smaller scale:D
    a television screen advertising smart telecom has been erected just under the budweiser sign on the top of grafton. Its my hope that this area will evolve into dublins time square/piccadilly circus… ๐Ÿ˜ฎ well not that cluttered as it is a small area, but i think a larger screen or two would suit. how does everyone else feel about screens in the city???

    I think the screen on Grafton St. will just make it harder for other screens to get PP and generate interest in potential advertisers for future screens, and for the record ihateawake, it’s an LED screen not a television!;)

    LED screens combine the colours red, green and blue at varying intensities to produce full colour video imaging. At the right viewing distance and intensity level these colours combine in each pixel to produce white. The screen on Grafton St. isn’t doing this. It also has at least one IM (an LED array) that isn’t producing colour.

    Another rather rudimentary factor to consider with LED screens is viewing angles. Depending on the mounting technology used the LEDs can block each other out from certain angles. There are also louvres between each row of LEDs to help with shading, sometimes these are pointed downwards for extra effect. Either way, these louvres are designed to run parallel with the horizon. The screen on Grafton St. is the only screen of its type I’ve ever seen that doesn’t do this. Why? It appears that the entire unit has been turned 90 degrees to make it fit on the wall. ๐Ÿ˜ฎ This makes the viewing angles far narrower than is usually acceptable for typical urban spaces and may have an impact on the IP65 ingress rating.

    There is definitely scope for the development of LED screens in Dublin but like everything else it needs to be done properly. Every screen that is poorly conceived and implemented makes it harder for the next one to get PP. Many cities have badly integrated LED screens that look poor and are in a state of disrepair. Hopefully Dublin will get it right.

    #784777

    Anonymous

    LED sry:rolleyes: Although I like city center screens, I agree that the grafton st one is terrible, and is in the wrong place. Like many other things new to our city, its faults are the result of bad planning or the complete lack thereof. Hopefully tellys;) will be considered in jc decaux’s new advertising scheme for dublin, such a reputable company should be able to integrate them into our city fairly well.

    #784778

    Anonymous

    @ihateawake wrote:

    LED sry:rolleyes: Although I like city center screens, I agree that the grafton st one is terrible, and is in the wrong place. Like many other things new to our city, its faults are the result of bad planning or the complete lack thereof. Hopefully tellys]new advertising scheme for dublin[/URL], such a reputable company should be able to integrate them into our city fairly well.

    That’s a very interesting link. I wonder if it will see private operators trying to maximise site revenue by turning to LED screens instead of hoarding sites. A small poster site could well be a large LED screen site. It’ll be interesting to see where it all ends up.

  • Author
    Posts
  • #784759

    Anonymous
    • Offline

    Here’s the full thing…

    Experts say special Grafton Street planning restrictions won’t work
    Gretchen Friemann

    Planning&Development: Special planning restrictions aimed at reversing the spread of mobile phone shops and convenience stores along Grafton Street are likely to backfire, according to a number of landlords and property experts.

    Two weeks ago Dublin City Council (DCC) proposed transforming the capital’s main shopping thoroughfare into an architectural conservation area (ACA) following mounting concerns over the street’s deteriorating character.

    The new planning designation will give the local authority strict control over what types of businesses can trade from the street and it’s expected that mobile phone shops, convenience stores and pharmacies will be among those retailers that are in future either limited or excluded from the prime shopping thoroughfare.

    But property experts claim such interference in the market is counter-productive.

    They argue that restricting certain retailers from acquiring leases simply “incentivises” the current undesirable occupiers to remain trading on the street and creates an unpredictable market dynamic.

    The fear is that under the ACA, leasehold values on certain properties will shoot through the roof making it harder for new, more attractive retailers to gain a foothold on the thoroughfare.

    For example, mobile phone companies pay top rents for their outlets but, if special planning restrictions limit their numbers, then their existing leaseholds become a scarce commodity. That means any retailer looking to buy-out the lease has to fork-out key money significantly above the going market rate. And, according to Stephen Murray, head of retail at Jones Lang LaSalle, “restricted” companies – like the mobile phone shops – could then be faced with “reverse premiums” if the leaseholds were impossible to sell at the adjusted value. In other words, the blacklisted retailer would have to pay another user to take over the terms of the lease if it wanted to exit the street.

    Murray argues that since few companies would agree to such a transaction, given the stratospheric rental terms they currently trade under, the ACA would “ironically be preserving” Grafton Street’s retail mix rather than enhancing it.

    However, Dick Gleeson, head of planning at Dublin City Council, maintains the special planning restrictions will improve the area’s appeal by offering easier access to certain retailers.

    Over the past few years supply constraints on Grafton Street have blocked the arrival of international fashion houses and Gleeson claims the ACA will ensure new traders are of a “quality and standard” that is appropriate for Ireland’s most famous shopping location.

    If the scheme is adopted as an amendment to the city development plan by the end of the year, as Dublin City Council hopes it will be, landlords and tenants will no longer be able to award a lease to the highest bidder.

    Instead the local authority will have the final say over what retailers can occupy Grafton Street.

    A list of “difficult users” will be compiled, identifying retailers that are banned from the thoroughfare and specifying other users that are only allowed in limited numbers.

    But, as property experts point out, Dublin City Council does not have a successful track record in controlling city centre retailing. Seven years ago the Ann Summers sex shop chain won its battle to open an outlet on O’Connell Street after it challenged the local authorities in the High Court.

    Some property experts argue the Grafton Street ACA could precipitate similar legal disputes.

    They also claim the mobile phone shops, convenience stores and pharmacies which have been at the centre of an increasingly bitter debate about Grafton Street’s tarnished image would have been flushed out by the forces of the free market.

    Hugh Linehan, head of property with Hibernian Investments, which owns six shops on the thoroughfare, insists the mobile phone outlets are temporary traders, more concerned with marketing than clocking up sales.

    “It’s difficult to imagine they can reconcile these high rents with the number of products they are selling. I think this is all about maintaining a high-profile image.”

    And he claims retailers, like the phone shops, will inevitably relocate as the demand for space increases from other users.

    Yet it is this constant churn that has most incensed local politicians and lobby groups, such as the Dublin City Business Organisation. They blame the institutional funds, which own large chunks of property along Grafton Street, for mismanaging the area and undermining its appeal to the general public.

    Over the past 12 months more than half a dozen shops have changed hands, most of them prompted by rent reviews where landlords have pushed for leases to increase to the latest Zone A benchmark.

    It is the highest churn rate in 20 years and has almost culled the street of indigenous retailers.

    However, Niall Gaffney, the investments director with IPUT, a property pension fund which owns five outlets on the thoroughfare, including the O2 Experience shop, insists Grafton Street’s problems could be solved by developing the surrounding area.

    “Henry Street really is stealing a march on Grafton Street at the moment because it has large-scale sites that can accommodate key tenants, like Arnotts and Roches Stores. So the most effective way to improve the retail mix on the southside is to offer more space and that means developing the large landbanks that surround Grafton Street.

    “They’re going some way to address this supply crunch with the South King Street and South Anne Street schemes but we need the local authorities to concentrate their efforts on encouraging more of these developments.”

    And he pointed out “you don’t attract big name retailers by slapping down ACAs. How many have moved into O’Connell Street as a result of similar planning restrictions? Henry Street proves the only way to attract these companies is by providing high-quality, large-scale units.”

    ร‚ยฉ The Irish Times

    #784760

    admin
    Keymaster
    • Offline

    Thanks for that Cobalt and how revealing it was to ๐Ÿ˜‰

    Gretchen should have her brief/future with the IT seriously considered after that article;

    #784761

    Anonymous
    • Offline
    Thomond Park wrote:
    ] Eh??:confused:
    #784762

    Anonymous
    • Offline

    While Grafton Street maybe Dublins busiest street, it has a lower spend per user than that of Henry Street.

    Grafton Street serves two main purposes: as a main shopping street and as a main pedestrian thouroughfare linking the city to St. Stephens Green and its associated office district. As such many of the users are simply going somewhere else.

    However Henry Street is more of a shopping Street than Grafton Street. It is not used as a thouroughfare in the sense that Grafton Street: it is not a link to any major business or commercial district. People mostly use Henry Street as a shopping destination.

    Is there not a contradiction in DCC seeking to improve the street by discouraging certain retailers but being interested in attracting Zara and its ilk? Surely this would accelerate the decline from a unique and high class shopping destination to a monotonous ‘high street’ repeated ad nauseum throughout Britain? In attempting to get Zara etc, it would involve knocking some of the smaller units together – destroying the variety of stores on offer on the street.

    Over the past century, once prosperous thouroughfares became economic backwaters and similarly once ignored streets became dominant retail districts. In the 1950s, O’Connell, Sth. Gt Georges and Thomas Streets vied with Henry Street and Grafton Street for attracting the mass of shoppers. Given the increasing attractiveness of Georges Street and Liffey Street for shoppers, may we be seeing other streets eclipsing the tired and jaded established retail core?

    #784763

    Anonymous
    • Offline

    looks like i got what i was looking for, although on a much smaller scale:D
    a television screen advertising smart telecom has been erected just under the budweiser sign on the top of grafton. Its my hope that this area will evolve into dublins time square/piccadilly circus… ๐Ÿ˜ฎ well not that cluttered as it is a small area, but i think a larger screen or two would suit. how does everyone else feel about screens in the city???

    #784764

    Anonymous
    • Offline

    @ihateawake wrote:

    looks like i got what i was looking for, although on a much smaller scale:D
    a television screen advertising smart telecom has been erected just under the budweiser sign on the top of grafton. Its my hope that this area will evolve into dublins time square/piccadilly circus… ๐Ÿ˜ฎ well not that cluttered as it is a small area, but i think a larger screen or two would suit. how does everyone else feel about screens in the city???

    I feel that you should shoot yourself ? Times square is kind of cool,but the billboards are simply hiding ugly buildings. Piccadilly circus is a cesspool of muck that makes temple bar look rarefied. It fails utterly to recreate the buzz of times square.Theres a place for garish lighting and tv billboards but it’s not on grafton street. i’m not sure we have somewhere that would suit. The newer buildings facing temple bar square would work, but that would cement temple bar as the dungeon of booze.The building to the east of the central bank (facing dame street ) might be an appropriate place . But on the whole it’s just a bad idea. Null points.

    #784765

    Anonymous
    • Offline

    :p Harsh, i dont think the area should be covered with them, but as the center of dublins commercial lifestyle, i think a little modernisation wouldnt hurt. The corner building over bus stop was certainly ugly enough to completely cover with that giant blue “Manpower” ad for a week or two. The old style buildings add class, I think, but not with a scrap metal budweiser sign and other ads hanging off them, I think they should take the ads down, or make them uniform and neat(a screen). The point village seems like it would be an ideal place.

    #784766

    Anonymous
    • Offline

    @ihateawake wrote:

    :Harsh

    Sorry! sarcasm just comes across as rudeness through de wonderfuul mediam ov de tinternett. My experience of times squares is that it works as it is an area full , no bursting , with theatres and “eateries” and such. I think that’s why The lighting on Piccadilly doesn’t work : there just aren’t enough places like theatres and cinemas . Piccadilly happens to have lots of people going by that’s all.It has no buzz at all. Grafton street would be the same. That’s why i suggested the square in temple bar , but there again no .Because i don’t think that would look quite right. The point village maybe , i’m not sure though. The top of liffey street , maybe the side of the central bank that faces dame street ( that might be cool , as the screens would be angled towards the ground). Maybe on the pedestrian area leading to talbot street from o’connell street .

    #784767

    Anonymous
    • Offline

    Np, I like sarcasm, once I cop onto it:D You’re right about piccadilly having no buzz, I suppose grafton is similar. Seems there is a large temporary screen fitted in the square in temple bar every year… http://www.eyecandymediapartners.com/press/stpatricksday_dublin2006/

    Mabey they should strap one to the spire

    #784768

    Anonymous
    • Offline

    Heinous as it might sound , i really really like the the spike. Especially at night.Wait maybe it’s a great idea ! The next time right wing nationalists go a marching down the liberator’s street we could display the level of support for their cause. Or flash nuggets of history onto the screen. I really like to see the reaction of a load of these loonies to “Robert Emmet was a prod , and so was Wolf Tone” scrolling across a big screen.

    #784769

    Anonymous
    • Offline

    heh, the poor telly wouldnt work too well with รขโ€šยฌ50,000 worth of street lodged in it

    #784770

    Anonymous
    • Offline

    Why not fly a blimp over the city, with a huge screen displaying news, information and advertisments? It’d be a huge attraction “There’s the famous Dublin blimp!” they’d say.

    #784771

    Anonymous
    • Offline

    The Harp building would be a great place for a big sparkly screen.

    #784772

    Anonymous
    • Offline

    I just feel that screens and flashy advertising look better in an area of height and scale, not to mention modernity. Highrise buildings or skyscrapers would reduce the impact and in a way make the dazzling signs seem somewhat more fitting. In a low rise street like Grafton, which is narrow and has much historic architecture a concentration of Time Square type advertising would look garishly out of place.

    There’s a screen tacked onto an old building in Shaftesbury Square in Belfast. It disfigures the Victorian(?) architecture and so looks a bit ridiculous. However, as the area is quite large and has already been fill with architectural crap over the past few decades it seems slightly less obtrusive than might have been the case.

    #784773

    Anonymous
    • Offline

    Yes, O’Connell House would be a good spot. The bridge and Westmorland St will be rid of cars soon anyway.

    Or how about BOI on college green? Perfect! ๐Ÿ˜‰

    #784774

    Anonymous
    • Offline

    Are they thinking of putting up a permament sign ??

    #784775

    Anonymous
    • Offline

    @maskhadov wrote:

    Are they thinking of putting up a permament sign ??

    no no ihateawake was just fantasising , it’s ok though i sent some hitmen to rough him up .

    #784776

    Anonymous
    • Offline

    @ihateawake wrote:

    looks like i got what i was looking for, although on a much smaller scale:D
    a television screen advertising smart telecom has been erected just under the budweiser sign on the top of grafton. Its my hope that this area will evolve into dublins time square/piccadilly circus… ๐Ÿ˜ฎ well not that cluttered as it is a small area, but i think a larger screen or two would suit. how does everyone else feel about screens in the city???

    I think the screen on Grafton St. will just make it harder for other screens to get PP and generate interest in potential advertisers for future screens, and for the record ihateawake, it’s an LED screen not a television!;)

    LED screens combine the colours red, green and blue at varying intensities to produce full colour video imaging. At the right viewing distance and intensity level these colours combine in each pixel to produce white. The screen on Grafton St. isn’t doing this. It also has at least one IM (an LED array) that isn’t producing colour.

    Another rather rudimentary factor to consider with LED screens is viewing angles. Depending on the mounting technology used the LEDs can block each other out from certain angles. There are also louvres between each row of LEDs to help with shading, sometimes these are pointed downwards for extra effect. Either way, these louvres are designed to run parallel with the horizon. The screen on Grafton St. is the only screen of its type I’ve ever seen that doesn’t do this. Why? It appears that the entire unit has been turned 90 degrees to make it fit on the wall. ๐Ÿ˜ฎ This makes the viewing angles far narrower than is usually acceptable for typical urban spaces and may have an impact on the IP65 ingress rating.

    There is definitely scope for the development of LED screens in Dublin but like everything else it needs to be done properly. Every screen that is poorly conceived and implemented makes it harder for the next one to get PP. Many cities have badly integrated LED screens that look poor and are in a state of disrepair. Hopefully Dublin will get it right.

    #784777

    Anonymous
    • Offline

    LED sry:rolleyes: Although I like city center screens, I agree that the grafton st one is terrible, and is in the wrong place. Like many other things new to our city, its faults are the result of bad planning or the complete lack thereof. Hopefully tellys;) will be considered in jc decaux’s new advertising scheme for dublin, such a reputable company should be able to integrate them into our city fairly well.

    #784778

    Anonymous
    • Offline

    @ihateawake wrote:

    LED sry:rolleyes: Although I like city center screens, I agree that the grafton st one is terrible, and is in the wrong place. Like many other things new to our city, its faults are the result of bad planning or the complete lack thereof. Hopefully tellys]new advertising scheme for dublin[/URL], such a reputable company should be able to integrate them into our city fairly well.

    That’s a very interesting link. I wonder if it will see private operators trying to maximise site revenue by turning to LED screens instead of hoarding sites. A small poster site could well be a large LED screen site. It’ll be interesting to see where it all ends up.

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