Grafton Street, Dublin

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  • #784779

    Anonymous

    This might be of some interest. The full plans were published in the week and I suppose as always comments from the public are welcome.

    Gratfon Street Architectural Conservation Area

    #784780

    Anonymous

    Thanks for that Stephen. Glad to see improvement works to the public domain is one of the core objectives of implementing the ACA at this point – the paving has deteriorated hugely in recent years (I’ll get some pics). It’s hardly surprising given the footfall of 15,000-20,000 people per hour during peak hours, nearly every day for the past 18 years.

    Cobblelock surfaces, being made up of small pieces, gradually lose their tightness and fall apart under such pressure. Similarly there must be hundreds of broken white paving tiles lining the street at this stage. The City Council are gradually losing the battle in keeping up the maintenance of what is simply a disintegrating surface – there’s constantly road works on the street solving only the worst problems, while the others wait their turn, deteriorating themselves.

    A few extracts from the ACA introduction:

    Grafton Street is one of Dublin’s best known destinations, celebrated in song, verse, film and literature with a long and rich history dating back to the early 17th century. The unique form of the street combined with the architectural quality of many of its buildings creates a distinctive physical character, which enhances the commercial and social functions of the street.

    Despite its strong physical character and economic performance, a number of recent trends is detracting from its attractiveness and threatening the long term viability of the street. These trends relate largely to the increasing imbalance in the mix of uses in the street, the deteriorating quality in the design of shopfronts and the public domain, including the condition of street paving and street furniture. As part of an initiative to address these issues Dublin City Council is proposing to designate the street as an Architectural Conservation Area. The character of Grafton Street is not rooted in any one dimension but is multi-faceted with economic, physical and social aspects, all of which contribute in part to its unique quality. It is this unique character that Dublin City council wishes to protect and enhance.

    Notably it says:

    It is an objective to carry out a co-ordinated street improvement scheme for Grafton Street that will upgrade the existing paving and street furniture. Paving work will be to a high design standard and of high quality paving materials and complementary in slab size, colour and texture with the architectural character of the street. As yet there is no time scale proposed for this work.

    As part of the proposed street improvement scheme it is proposed to create a new public space at the top of Grafton St at its junction with St Stephens Green and to provide for a special treatment of the space at the junction with Nassau St/Suffolk St.

    The latter in particular is good news – Lower Grafton Street is a complete shambles, so much so that most people don’t even know it is a street al all, let alone Grafton Street. It has no coherence whatsoever, packed to the rafters with urban clutter, bus stops, buses and more buses, bus queues, parking bays, bicycle parking, vans constantly unloading, shocking paving, motorway street lighting, wholly inadequate space for pedestrians etc etc etc. Bit like Nassau Street so 🙂 :rolleyes:

    Whatever public scheme is devised for Grafton Street proper must be pulled out into Lower Grafton St to spacially link the two areas. The character of the scheme also ought to be similar to that we currently have – a warm distinctive paving, kept simple without acres of granite cobble being plonked down every few metres to denote every nodal point, entrance and crossing on the street, and with traditionally-influenced street furnishings. Indeed I’d even suggest retaining the current lampposts but updating them with more contemporary heads. It’d be terrible to see the pleasant welcoming character of the street (even if only created 20 years ago) replaced with a cold and sterile Barcelona treatment. Certainly update it – just keep that warmth.

    Indeed looking back, it was a major undertaking in 1988 or so to pave that entire street – a massive project by any standards, especially in a city that had never done anything like this before, and with such tight resources. Does anyone know if the granite used in the paving is Irish? It’s lovely and coarse-grained, and also warmer than the Chinese and Portuguese stuff we’re getting today. Perhaps the last use of Irish granite in the paving of the capital?

    #784781

    Anonymous

    The DCC published plans by the Road Works Department to redesign and improve the pedestrian areas on Suffolk Street just recently. Unfortunately I never got to have a look and wouldnt you know it, its not on the website. I imagine they are widening the pavements in light of all the new retail going in here. No doubt the Habitat developers demanded it from the not inconsiderable development levies they had to pay.

    Really the whole area needs a coherent plan, and I agree fully with what you say about lower Grafton Street. Its a mess and always has been, especially when one considers its footfall.

    I think an architectural competition is required to get a really interesting vision for the street. More chinese granite and stainless steel would not be welcome.

    #784782

    Anonymous

    From today’s Independent. As has been said a slight case of the horse having bolted but better late than never I suppose…

    Council to wage war on shopfront shockers

    DUBLIN City Council has deemed that Grafton Street is in danger of growing old disgracefully.

    It has set itself the task of restoring some “old decency” to the thoroughfare.

    The city fathers are concerned the area is in real danger of becoming more bargain basement than haute couture.

    They have issued an SOS – save our status – in the hope of restoring the street’s fading grandeur, and reviving its high class shopping ambiance.

    A similar plan was successfully used to bring dignity back to O’Connell Street more than a decade ago, when it was deemed that burger joints and amusement arcades were draining its character.

    Under the council’s radical new proposals, fashion stores, beauticians and art galleries would be favoured.

    But no more fast food shops, betting shops, phone call outlets or banks will get planning permission on the capital’s premier shopping street.

    Loud music, showy shop signs and flashy advertising would be banished from the area which has become “tired”, according to the council. Among the “worst offenders” for overly colourful branding are Vodafone and Spar, its report claims.

    It says too many mobile phone shops, newsagents and pharmacies are threatening Grafton Street’s position as Ireland’s most upmarket shopping area.

    The council claims heavy branding, “jarring” signs and broken paving have reduced the street’s appeal.

    In the proposed draft variation of the Dublin City Development Plan, it is claimed this has “serious implications” for the future of Grafton Street” and its role in the city centre.

    The council wants to make Grafton Street an architectural conservation area (ACA), which would mean any changes to a shopfront would require planning permission. There would be an upgrade of the street’s paving, bins and signs.

    Feedback on the plan is being sought at present, but it is expected to be introduced before the autumn.

    The council says that the street “has a warm and intimate character”, but this has been damaged in recent years.

    It states the growing number of non-fashion shops have created “an imbalance in the mix of units in the street”.

    If Grafton Street gets ACA status, a new public space would be created near St Stephen’s Green and special planning controls would be put in place to help improve the mix of retailers and encourage high fashion stores.

    Flashy colours would have to “be avoided” and corporate branding would have to blend in with historical buildings.

    However, the high rents on Grafton Street have already pushed many retailers out of the street.

    Critics of the council’s plan are likely to point out that mobile phone giants and convenience stores are the only type of outlets which can now afford to locate there.

    SPAR Ireland said last night that it was an international brand but would continue to talk to Dublin City Council about store design. Vodafone said it would contribute to the consultation process and was complying with planning permission.

    Samantha McCaughren

    #784783

    Anonymous

    Samantha sounds like she is from another city, especially at the start. The difference in the style between the Time s and the Indo is so obvious in stories such as these.

    #784784

    Anonymous

    “the street has a warm and intimate character” – nice to see this is acknowledged, as is the poor state of the paving.

    Below is only a fraction of the damage at the paving at the southern (Green) end. The northern end is actually much worse – possibly down to the heavy traffic entering here that disperses into side streets before reaching the south.

    These are everywhere:

    Loose bricks all about too:

    And typical remedial works:

    The place was in a terrible state after Christmas – a lot of work has taken place since then to patch things up.
    To consider how bad Grafton Street has become in places, just think of how pleasant Henry Street is to walk on – its acres of billiard table-like paving is a joy to walk on, by far the best pedestrian surface in the entire city, with no kerbs or tree holes or crossings or raised areas; you don’t even have to look where you’re walking.
    Grafton Street is a disaster by comparision – it’s very easy to trip up if you’re not careful. Thankfully this is going to be addressed.

    As suspected, the Grafton St lampposts appear to be original Hammond Lane models, probably from the inner suburbs. Here’s the stamp on the base:

    There are repro versions of these about the city too though – indeed it is just about conceivable even these are repros, cast from originals with the stamp retained! Hopefully not.
    Always hate these wonky extension arms though – they look ridiculous, and elevate high above the street what should be intimate pedestrian street lighting:

    They seem to have been raised to accomodate the flower baskets. THey do look magnificent in high summer (though arguably should be a single colour), but could be moved a bit lower down to preserve the lampposts as designed. And the light emitted is secondary anyway – they’re really only decorative, not least as there’s domestic CFL bulbs in them :rolleyes:. Grafton Street is mainly lit by lamps attached to the buildings.

    Also some of the lovely granite – surely Irish?

    #784785

    Anonymous

    I think that one of the first things they should do is introduce a standardised signage for shops on the street. Most of the Champs Elysees has shopfront names in silver lettering that are suspended a few inches from the shopfront. I think that could work on Grafton Street, particularly if the maximum size of each letters was set in stone (It should be around 10-12 inches I think). That way the gaudy fast food/Londis/HMV/Next signage would be gone.

    #784786

    Anonymous

    I think Graham its more likely the extended sections were introduced because the lamp kept getting smashed by gurriers. They were how enough to scale up a bit and take a good swipe. Interestingly some of the mlamps on Talbot St are of this height without an extra attachment.

    Regent St in London is also a good example of standardised shopfronts/signage

    #784787

    admin
    Keymaster

    I can see where you are coming from in relation to signage and lets be honest there has been a terrible attitude towards what is considered acceptable in Ireland in common with many other places.

    However I do not feel that introducing a manditory signage regime would be ideal either given the architectural diversity on our main streets with particular reference to places like Pana or Grafton Street.

    For a start a prescriptive regime would eliminate all possibility for innovative contemporary designs and this would be retrograde in my opinion. If the concept of ACAs were enforced signage would present a medium for retailers to drawn attention to their pitches without undermining the architectural integrity of their location.

    A good example of good signage is the Spar shop on Camden Street where simple contemporary metal lettering has been used on a period building.

    #784788

    Anonymous

    @Thomond Park wrote:

    For a start a prescriptive regime would eliminate all possibility for innovative contemporary designs and this would be retrograde in my opinion. If the concept of ACAs were enforced signage would present a medium for retailers to drawn attention to their pitches without undermining the architectural integrity of their location.

    A good example of good signage is the Spar shop on Camden Street where simple contemporary metal lettering has been used on a period building.

    Which is pretty much what i suggested. As for the innovative contemporary designs, they could still use them in shopping centres. I don’t think there should be big Golden Arches etc on Grafton St. In Krakow, Paris etc they use metallic/silver lettering on the main street and I think that should be the case here too – they could still use them on streets other than Grafton St , Henry St and O’Connell St.

    #784789

    admin
    Keymaster

    I certainly wasn’t referring to McDonalds signage or footlocker or any other generic design as being innovative in any sense. What I was referring to are the type of shopfront such as No.1 Clare Street or Neu Bleu Eru on South William Street

    #784790

    Anonymous

    I’ve never seen standardised signage in operation, there’s not many decent pics on the internet – anyone know of any links?
    It’s certainly an interesting idea for Grafton Street, though I wouldn’t like to see it tip too far over into homogenisation – if it could be done using basic templates but retaining individuality it’d certainly be something to consider.
    The Champs

    #784791

    Anonymous

    two McDonalds and two Quick Burgers – it’s as bad as O’Connell Street :rolleyes:

    http://www.magicparis.com/CHAMPsElYsEEs/En/FrameFastfood.htm

    #784792

    Anonymous

    Can Grafton Street survive as Ireland’s premiere retail core with the change in Ireland’s retail market.

    #784793

    Paul Clerkin
    Keymaster

    No I don’t think so – too much is against it – the relative small size of buildings means it cannot compete for the masses like henry Street. Its future could lie in high-end shops – smaller unites, high priced goods…

    #784794

    Anonymous

    Back to what it was, then …

    Some years ago, an aunt of mine, coming home from America after 20 years, remarked that ‘you don’t expect to see McDonalds on Grafton Street’. She thought it had really gone downhill from what she remembered it to be.

    We think it’s posh now cos it has a handful of high-end shops – Weir’s & Brown T’s – but apparently it was all like that not too long ago.

    #784795

    Anonymous

    Given the fuss over the number of mobile phone stores on Grafton Street, 6 if I’m correct, I find it amazing that no one seems to have batted an eyelid at the announcement over the weekend by the mobile operator 3 Ireland saying it intends to open its own store on Grafton Street shortly…

    #784796

    Anonymous

    What is replacing Golden Discs?

    #784797

    Anonymous

    @The Denouncer wrote:

    What is replacing Golden Discs?

    Planning application yet to be lodged, it will be a department store but it is being marketed at present. H&M and Zara were expected to be favourites but now are to open in Sth King Street according to Irish Times. Ann Summers, Penneys, Next and Mango are all looking for stores on Grafton St

    #784798

    Anonymous

    Why are there no ‘top-end’ stores gunning for the street? Do they just not need the exposure?

  • Author
    Posts
  • #784779

    Anonymous
    • Offline

    This might be of some interest. The full plans were published in the week and I suppose as always comments from the public are welcome.

    Gratfon Street Architectural Conservation Area

    #784780

    Anonymous
    • Offline

    Thanks for that Stephen. Glad to see improvement works to the public domain is one of the core objectives of implementing the ACA at this point – the paving has deteriorated hugely in recent years (I’ll get some pics). It’s hardly surprising given the footfall of 15,000-20,000 people per hour during peak hours, nearly every day for the past 18 years.

    Cobblelock surfaces, being made up of small pieces, gradually lose their tightness and fall apart under such pressure. Similarly there must be hundreds of broken white paving tiles lining the street at this stage. The City Council are gradually losing the battle in keeping up the maintenance of what is simply a disintegrating surface – there’s constantly road works on the street solving only the worst problems, while the others wait their turn, deteriorating themselves.

    A few extracts from the ACA introduction:

    Grafton Street is one of Dublin’s best known destinations, celebrated in song, verse, film and literature with a long and rich history dating back to the early 17th century. The unique form of the street combined with the architectural quality of many of its buildings creates a distinctive physical character, which enhances the commercial and social functions of the street.

    Despite its strong physical character and economic performance, a number of recent trends is detracting from its attractiveness and threatening the long term viability of the street. These trends relate largely to the increasing imbalance in the mix of uses in the street, the deteriorating quality in the design of shopfronts and the public domain, including the condition of street paving and street furniture. As part of an initiative to address these issues Dublin City Council is proposing to designate the street as an Architectural Conservation Area. The character of Grafton Street is not rooted in any one dimension but is multi-faceted with economic, physical and social aspects, all of which contribute in part to its unique quality. It is this unique character that Dublin City council wishes to protect and enhance.

    Notably it says:

    It is an objective to carry out a co-ordinated street improvement scheme for Grafton Street that will upgrade the existing paving and street furniture. Paving work will be to a high design standard and of high quality paving materials and complementary in slab size, colour and texture with the architectural character of the street. As yet there is no time scale proposed for this work.

    As part of the proposed street improvement scheme it is proposed to create a new public space at the top of Grafton St at its junction with St Stephens Green and to provide for a special treatment of the space at the junction with Nassau St/Suffolk St.

    The latter in particular is good news – Lower Grafton Street is a complete shambles, so much so that most people don’t even know it is a street al all, let alone Grafton Street. It has no coherence whatsoever, packed to the rafters with urban clutter, bus stops, buses and more buses, bus queues, parking bays, bicycle parking, vans constantly unloading, shocking paving, motorway street lighting, wholly inadequate space for pedestrians etc etc etc. Bit like Nassau Street so 🙂 :rolleyes:

    Whatever public scheme is devised for Grafton Street proper must be pulled out into Lower Grafton St to spacially link the two areas. The character of the scheme also ought to be similar to that we currently have – a warm distinctive paving, kept simple without acres of granite cobble being plonked down every few metres to denote every nodal point, entrance and crossing on the street, and with traditionally-influenced street furnishings. Indeed I’d even suggest retaining the current lampposts but updating them with more contemporary heads. It’d be terrible to see the pleasant welcoming character of the street (even if only created 20 years ago) replaced with a cold and sterile Barcelona treatment. Certainly update it – just keep that warmth.

    Indeed looking back, it was a major undertaking in 1988 or so to pave that entire street – a massive project by any standards, especially in a city that had never done anything like this before, and with such tight resources. Does anyone know if the granite used in the paving is Irish? It’s lovely and coarse-grained, and also warmer than the Chinese and Portuguese stuff we’re getting today. Perhaps the last use of Irish granite in the paving of the capital?

    #784781

    Anonymous
    • Offline

    The DCC published plans by the Road Works Department to redesign and improve the pedestrian areas on Suffolk Street just recently. Unfortunately I never got to have a look and wouldnt you know it, its not on the website. I imagine they are widening the pavements in light of all the new retail going in here. No doubt the Habitat developers demanded it from the not inconsiderable development levies they had to pay.

    Really the whole area needs a coherent plan, and I agree fully with what you say about lower Grafton Street. Its a mess and always has been, especially when one considers its footfall.

    I think an architectural competition is required to get a really interesting vision for the street. More chinese granite and stainless steel would not be welcome.

    #784782

    Anonymous
    • Offline

    From today’s Independent. As has been said a slight case of the horse having bolted but better late than never I suppose…

    Council to wage war on shopfront shockers

    DUBLIN City Council has deemed that Grafton Street is in danger of growing old disgracefully.

    It has set itself the task of restoring some “old decency” to the thoroughfare.

    The city fathers are concerned the area is in real danger of becoming more bargain basement than haute couture.

    They have issued an SOS – save our status – in the hope of restoring the street’s fading grandeur, and reviving its high class shopping ambiance.

    A similar plan was successfully used to bring dignity back to O’Connell Street more than a decade ago, when it was deemed that burger joints and amusement arcades were draining its character.

    Under the council’s radical new proposals, fashion stores, beauticians and art galleries would be favoured.

    But no more fast food shops, betting shops, phone call outlets or banks will get planning permission on the capital’s premier shopping street.

    Loud music, showy shop signs and flashy advertising would be banished from the area which has become “tired”, according to the council. Among the “worst offenders” for overly colourful branding are Vodafone and Spar, its report claims.

    It says too many mobile phone shops, newsagents and pharmacies are threatening Grafton Street’s position as Ireland’s most upmarket shopping area.

    The council claims heavy branding, “jarring” signs and broken paving have reduced the street’s appeal.

    In the proposed draft variation of the Dublin City Development Plan, it is claimed this has “serious implications” for the future of Grafton Street” and its role in the city centre.

    The council wants to make Grafton Street an architectural conservation area (ACA), which would mean any changes to a shopfront would require planning permission. There would be an upgrade of the street’s paving, bins and signs.

    Feedback on the plan is being sought at present, but it is expected to be introduced before the autumn.

    The council says that the street “has a warm and intimate character”, but this has been damaged in recent years.

    It states the growing number of non-fashion shops have created “an imbalance in the mix of units in the street”.

    If Grafton Street gets ACA status, a new public space would be created near St Stephen’s Green and special planning controls would be put in place to help improve the mix of retailers and encourage high fashion stores.

    Flashy colours would have to “be avoided” and corporate branding would have to blend in with historical buildings.

    However, the high rents on Grafton Street have already pushed many retailers out of the street.

    Critics of the council’s plan are likely to point out that mobile phone giants and convenience stores are the only type of outlets which can now afford to locate there.

    SPAR Ireland said last night that it was an international brand but would continue to talk to Dublin City Council about store design. Vodafone said it would contribute to the consultation process and was complying with planning permission.

    Samantha McCaughren

    #784783

    Anonymous
    • Offline

    Samantha sounds like she is from another city, especially at the start. The difference in the style between the Time s and the Indo is so obvious in stories such as these.

    #784784

    Anonymous
    • Offline

    “the street has a warm and intimate character” – nice to see this is acknowledged, as is the poor state of the paving.

    Below is only a fraction of the damage at the paving at the southern (Green) end. The northern end is actually much worse – possibly down to the heavy traffic entering here that disperses into side streets before reaching the south.

    These are everywhere:

    Loose bricks all about too:

    And typical remedial works:

    The place was in a terrible state after Christmas – a lot of work has taken place since then to patch things up.
    To consider how bad Grafton Street has become in places, just think of how pleasant Henry Street is to walk on – its acres of billiard table-like paving is a joy to walk on, by far the best pedestrian surface in the entire city, with no kerbs or tree holes or crossings or raised areas; you don’t even have to look where you’re walking.
    Grafton Street is a disaster by comparision – it’s very easy to trip up if you’re not careful. Thankfully this is going to be addressed.

    As suspected, the Grafton St lampposts appear to be original Hammond Lane models, probably from the inner suburbs. Here’s the stamp on the base:

    There are repro versions of these about the city too though – indeed it is just about conceivable even these are repros, cast from originals with the stamp retained! Hopefully not.
    Always hate these wonky extension arms though – they look ridiculous, and elevate high above the street what should be intimate pedestrian street lighting:

    They seem to have been raised to accomodate the flower baskets. THey do look magnificent in high summer (though arguably should be a single colour), but could be moved a bit lower down to preserve the lampposts as designed. And the light emitted is secondary anyway – they’re really only decorative, not least as there’s domestic CFL bulbs in them :rolleyes:. Grafton Street is mainly lit by lamps attached to the buildings.

    Also some of the lovely granite – surely Irish?

    #784785

    Anonymous
    • Offline

    I think that one of the first things they should do is introduce a standardised signage for shops on the street. Most of the Champs Elysees has shopfront names in silver lettering that are suspended a few inches from the shopfront. I think that could work on Grafton Street, particularly if the maximum size of each letters was set in stone (It should be around 10-12 inches I think). That way the gaudy fast food/Londis/HMV/Next signage would be gone.

    #784786

    Anonymous
    • Offline

    I think Graham its more likely the extended sections were introduced because the lamp kept getting smashed by gurriers. They were how enough to scale up a bit and take a good swipe. Interestingly some of the mlamps on Talbot St are of this height without an extra attachment.

    Regent St in London is also a good example of standardised shopfronts/signage

    #784787

    admin
    Keymaster
    • Offline

    I can see where you are coming from in relation to signage and lets be honest there has been a terrible attitude towards what is considered acceptable in Ireland in common with many other places.

    However I do not feel that introducing a manditory signage regime would be ideal either given the architectural diversity on our main streets with particular reference to places like Pana or Grafton Street.

    For a start a prescriptive regime would eliminate all possibility for innovative contemporary designs and this would be retrograde in my opinion. If the concept of ACAs were enforced signage would present a medium for retailers to drawn attention to their pitches without undermining the architectural integrity of their location.

    A good example of good signage is the Spar shop on Camden Street where simple contemporary metal lettering has been used on a period building.

    #784788

    Anonymous
    • Offline

    @Thomond Park wrote:

    For a start a prescriptive regime would eliminate all possibility for innovative contemporary designs and this would be retrograde in my opinion. If the concept of ACAs were enforced signage would present a medium for retailers to drawn attention to their pitches without undermining the architectural integrity of their location.

    A good example of good signage is the Spar shop on Camden Street where simple contemporary metal lettering has been used on a period building.

    Which is pretty much what i suggested. As for the innovative contemporary designs, they could still use them in shopping centres. I don’t think there should be big Golden Arches etc on Grafton St. In Krakow, Paris etc they use metallic/silver lettering on the main street and I think that should be the case here too – they could still use them on streets other than Grafton St , Henry St and O’Connell St.

    #784789

    admin
    Keymaster
    • Offline

    I certainly wasn’t referring to McDonalds signage or footlocker or any other generic design as being innovative in any sense. What I was referring to are the type of shopfront such as No.1 Clare Street or Neu Bleu Eru on South William Street

    #784790

    Anonymous
    • Offline

    I’ve never seen standardised signage in operation, there’s not many decent pics on the internet – anyone know of any links?
    It’s certainly an interesting idea for Grafton Street, though I wouldn’t like to see it tip too far over into homogenisation – if it could be done using basic templates but retaining individuality it’d certainly be something to consider.
    The Champs

    #784791

    Anonymous
    • Offline

    two McDonalds and two Quick Burgers – it’s as bad as O’Connell Street :rolleyes:

    http://www.magicparis.com/CHAMPsElYsEEs/En/FrameFastfood.htm

    #784792

    Anonymous
    • Offline

    Can Grafton Street survive as Ireland’s premiere retail core with the change in Ireland’s retail market.

    #784793

    Paul Clerkin
    Keymaster
    • Offline

    No I don’t think so – too much is against it – the relative small size of buildings means it cannot compete for the masses like henry Street. Its future could lie in high-end shops – smaller unites, high priced goods…

    #784794

    Anonymous
    • Offline

    Back to what it was, then …

    Some years ago, an aunt of mine, coming home from America after 20 years, remarked that ‘you don’t expect to see McDonalds on Grafton Street’. She thought it had really gone downhill from what she remembered it to be.

    We think it’s posh now cos it has a handful of high-end shops – Weir’s & Brown T’s – but apparently it was all like that not too long ago.

    #784795

    Anonymous
    • Offline

    Given the fuss over the number of mobile phone stores on Grafton Street, 6 if I’m correct, I find it amazing that no one seems to have batted an eyelid at the announcement over the weekend by the mobile operator 3 Ireland saying it intends to open its own store on Grafton Street shortly…

    #784796

    Anonymous
    • Offline

    What is replacing Golden Discs?

    #784797

    Anonymous
    • Offline

    @The Denouncer wrote:

    What is replacing Golden Discs?

    Planning application yet to be lodged, it will be a department store but it is being marketed at present. H&M and Zara were expected to be favourites but now are to open in Sth King Street according to Irish Times. Ann Summers, Penneys, Next and Mango are all looking for stores on Grafton St

    #784798

    Anonymous
    • Offline

    Why are there no ‘top-end’ stores gunning for the street? Do they just not need the exposure?

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