Trinity College Dublin

Home Forums Ireland Trinity College Dublin

This topic contains 322 replies, has 46 voices, and was last updated by  admin 1 year, 4 months ago.

Viewing 20 posts - 301 through 320 (of 323 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #801708

    Anonymous

    I have to say its very disheartening to witness this seemingly pervasive attitude of carelessness to the city’s built environment. We are seeing it here with these lamps. It can be seen on Palace Street and on the plans for Grafton Street. And it can be seen throughout the city in the attitude of building owners to their properties.

    It stands in stark contrast to the situation in London (having observed it over the past few days) where quality period buildings are not only maintained but are generally highly sought after to bring prestige to a business. Wandering around areas like Covent Garden you cant help but be impressed at how well maintained most buildings are, and how shopfronts are of high quality. UK high streets undoubtedly have their downsides (the pervasion of chains and brands being one) but for the most part they are really well maintained and historic features are generally treasured and cared for. Unlike poor old Trinity’s lamps.

    Its also worth noting the condition of the central piers of the railing facing Dawson Street…in very poor state of repair.

    #801709

    Anonymous

    …perhaps a temporary measure whilst the other two are being refurbished?

    #801710

    Anonymous

    lets hope so.

    #801711

    Anonymous

    Meanwhile, from one half-arsed lighting scheme to another…just outside Trinity’s gates. Its now 8 months since this scheme was halted (abandoned?). Its anyone’s guess where the lifted paving slabs are.

    #801712

    Anonymous

    Ooooh admiring a completed facade of the Museum building today which is currently being cleaned and restored. Looks fantastic…its gonna be good.

    #801713

    Anonymous

    The recently uncovered north facade of the Museum Building in TCD:

    #801714

    Anonymous

    A beautiful details…which I never noticed before

    So few ornate lamps remaining in the city; this one is particularly striking.

    #801715

    Anonymous

    Beautiful detailing in the stonework too of course

    #801716

    Anonymous

    The south and west facades are still under wraps.

    The main square and Campanile looked stunning in the summer sun

    #801717

    Anonymous

    Perhaps when they have finished they could pop around the corner…

    #801718

    Anonymous
    #801719

    Paul Clerkin
    Keymaster

    An old cigarette card showing Trinity before the GMB and the work to the Rubrics

    #801720

    Anonymous

    @StephenC wrote:

    The recently uncovered north facade of the Museum Building in TCD:

    The building is now fully uncovered and looks fantastic…well worth a visit. And well worth a GrahamH dissertation! We don’t get this much these days.

    Separately, in TCD…I notice that the lamps at the College Green entrance have still not been replaced. A hugely complicated undertaking to restore them?

    #801721

    Anonymous

    A conservation project of enormous significance to Irish architecture, this €500,000 Museum Building initiative has been slowly revealing a building of simply staggering quality.

    I’m sure the architects of Ireland are more than capable of showcasing one of their profession’s most outstanding achievements.

    #801722

    Paul Clerkin
    Keymaster

    Here’s a little piece I came across on the carvings in the museum

    http://archiseek.com/2013/1856-design-for-capitals-museum-trinity-college-dublin/#.UgpHFZJzG84

    #801723

    Anonymous

    Its so lovely this building…its an island of care and quality in a sea of city centre dross.

    The next project for TCD to tackle is surely their Pearse Street buildings which are in dreadful condition.

    And still no sign of the repaired lamps at the iconic College Green entrance?

    #801408

    Anonymous

    The next project for TCD to tackle is surely their Pearse Street buildings which are in dreadful condition.

    No.
    The next project for TCD is to move all the engineering and physical sciences departments to a new technology campus and release the old buildings they presently occupy for occupantion by tenants more sympathetic to their upkeep.

    As things stand there is every argument in favour of this move like

    * TCD’s engineering school is longtime the worst in Ireland, largely due to inadequate labs;
    * You can’t adapt old buildings to modern flexible arrangement needed by engineering/science labs;
    * There is no more space in the College Green site;
    * The antique buildings and too many non-scientist types surrounding the engineering/science faculty
    has a demoralising effect on all wanting freedom to make technological progress;
    * TCD already has a nice chunk of ground around the old canal docks which could be developed;

    and only one plausible argument against it, i.e. that there would be less social mixing :p 😎 between the humanities/social sciences/life sciences students and those relocated to the new tech campus.
    But I think that a dedicated rail line (within the existing track) between the two campuses could solve a lot of this.
    It would also enable lecturing staff to travel from one campus to the other in good time.

    Yes, this’ll take a share of dough.
    But I notice a few multi-millionaires on the TCD development board :
    http://www.tcd.ie/development/about/ourboard.php

    I think that money and its raising is not the real issue here.
    It seems to me that the real issue is the attitude of those who appoint the board and approve its objectives . . . .
    The crusty old farts club.

    #801724

    Anonymous

    Would anybody be kind enough to post the birdeye perspective by Samuel Byron. In addition to the full Library Square I think it contained a few speculated buildings which were never built.

    Thanks

    #801725

    Anonymous

    Hey Gang

    I have just been leafing through a copy of “Dublin – A Grand Tour” (Jacqueline O’Brien/Desmond Guinness) which I found in my parents house. There were a few pieces of Information which I hadn’t heard before.

    Firstly, the present Dining Hall is actually the second design executed by Hugh Darley. The original plan, designed by Richard Cassels was abandoned after no less then two collapses during construction. Likewise, Cassels designed a monumental spire and Classical frontage for the Chapel which proved unstable and had to be demolished, probably replaced by the current Chapel (by Chambers/Myers). The spire is famous as it appears in numerous Eighteenth Century illustrations, most notably in in the painting of the Irish Volunteers rally on College Green, when it seems to loom over proceedings. Cassels run of bad luck continued when he designed a new West Front only for the commission to go to the amateur architect Theodore Jacobsen….unsurprising given Cassels less the stellar history where Trinity is concerned! Intriguingly, Jacobsen intended to have the College Green Facade surmounted by a large central Dome over the entrance flanked by cupolas at each end. Apparently, the Northern Cupola was actually constructed, but later dismantled. The planned Dome is the reason for some quirky internal divisions in the central block.

    Lastly, as we all know most of the oldest parts of Trinity pre-1700 do not survive. Including the original monastic buildings. However, looking at Charles Brookings “A Map of the City and Suburbs of Dublin” there is an illustration of “The front of the College” which shows a Classical Building I have never seen before. Certainly, more substantial then any depictions of the “old Trinity” I have seen previously.

    C

    #801726

    Anonymous

    The west front, as depicted by Brooking, has never received the attention it deserves, despite the fact that Trinity has an actual ‘History of Art and Architecture Dept.’

    The best publications dealing with the development of Trinity are;

    a slim pamphlet entitled, ‘The Buildings of Trinity College Dublin’ by McParland, reprinted from a Country Life article about 1980, and an up-date of this in another McParland publication called ‘The Public Architecture of Ireland’, or something very similar,

    and an article by Linzi Simpson in ‘Medieval Dublin XIII’ published in 2013.

    . . . but don’t expect to find too much discussion on the old west front.

  • Author
    Posts
  • #801708

    Anonymous
    • Offline

    I have to say its very disheartening to witness this seemingly pervasive attitude of carelessness to the city’s built environment. We are seeing it here with these lamps. It can be seen on Palace Street and on the plans for Grafton Street. And it can be seen throughout the city in the attitude of building owners to their properties.

    It stands in stark contrast to the situation in London (having observed it over the past few days) where quality period buildings are not only maintained but are generally highly sought after to bring prestige to a business. Wandering around areas like Covent Garden you cant help but be impressed at how well maintained most buildings are, and how shopfronts are of high quality. UK high streets undoubtedly have their downsides (the pervasion of chains and brands being one) but for the most part they are really well maintained and historic features are generally treasured and cared for. Unlike poor old Trinity’s lamps.

    Its also worth noting the condition of the central piers of the railing facing Dawson Street…in very poor state of repair.

    #801709

    Anonymous
    • Offline

    …perhaps a temporary measure whilst the other two are being refurbished?

    #801710

    Anonymous
    • Offline

    lets hope so.

    #801711

    Anonymous
    • Offline

    Meanwhile, from one half-arsed lighting scheme to another…just outside Trinity’s gates. Its now 8 months since this scheme was halted (abandoned?). Its anyone’s guess where the lifted paving slabs are.

    #801712

    Anonymous
    • Offline

    Ooooh admiring a completed facade of the Museum building today which is currently being cleaned and restored. Looks fantastic…its gonna be good.

    #801713

    Anonymous
    • Offline

    The recently uncovered north facade of the Museum Building in TCD:

    #801714

    Anonymous
    • Offline

    A beautiful details…which I never noticed before

    So few ornate lamps remaining in the city; this one is particularly striking.

    #801715

    Anonymous
    • Offline

    Beautiful detailing in the stonework too of course

    #801716

    Anonymous
    • Offline

    The south and west facades are still under wraps.

    The main square and Campanile looked stunning in the summer sun

    #801717

    Anonymous
    • Offline

    Perhaps when they have finished they could pop around the corner…

    #801718
    #801719

    Paul Clerkin
    Keymaster
    • Offline

    An old cigarette card showing Trinity before the GMB and the work to the Rubrics

    #801720

    Anonymous
    • Offline

    @StephenC wrote:

    The recently uncovered north facade of the Museum Building in TCD:

    The building is now fully uncovered and looks fantastic…well worth a visit. And well worth a GrahamH dissertation! We don’t get this much these days.

    Separately, in TCD…I notice that the lamps at the College Green entrance have still not been replaced. A hugely complicated undertaking to restore them?

    #801721

    Anonymous
    • Offline

    A conservation project of enormous significance to Irish architecture, this €500,000 Museum Building initiative has been slowly revealing a building of simply staggering quality.

    I’m sure the architects of Ireland are more than capable of showcasing one of their profession’s most outstanding achievements.

    #801722

    Paul Clerkin
    Keymaster
    • Offline

    Here’s a little piece I came across on the carvings in the museum

    http://archiseek.com/2013/1856-design-for-capitals-museum-trinity-college-dublin/#.UgpHFZJzG84

    #801723

    Anonymous
    • Offline

    Its so lovely this building…its an island of care and quality in a sea of city centre dross.

    The next project for TCD to tackle is surely their Pearse Street buildings which are in dreadful condition.

    And still no sign of the repaired lamps at the iconic College Green entrance?

    #801408

    Anonymous
    • Offline

    The next project for TCD to tackle is surely their Pearse Street buildings which are in dreadful condition.

    No.
    The next project for TCD is to move all the engineering and physical sciences departments to a new technology campus and release the old buildings they presently occupy for occupantion by tenants more sympathetic to their upkeep.

    As things stand there is every argument in favour of this move like

    * TCD’s engineering school is longtime the worst in Ireland, largely due to inadequate labs;
    * You can’t adapt old buildings to modern flexible arrangement needed by engineering/science labs;
    * There is no more space in the College Green site;
    * The antique buildings and too many non-scientist types surrounding the engineering/science faculty
    has a demoralising effect on all wanting freedom to make technological progress;
    * TCD already has a nice chunk of ground around the old canal docks which could be developed;

    and only one plausible argument against it, i.e. that there would be less social mixing :p 😎 between the humanities/social sciences/life sciences students and those relocated to the new tech campus.
    But I think that a dedicated rail line (within the existing track) between the two campuses could solve a lot of this.
    It would also enable lecturing staff to travel from one campus to the other in good time.

    Yes, this’ll take a share of dough.
    But I notice a few multi-millionaires on the TCD development board :
    http://www.tcd.ie/development/about/ourboard.php

    I think that money and its raising is not the real issue here.
    It seems to me that the real issue is the attitude of those who appoint the board and approve its objectives . . . .
    The crusty old farts club.

    #801724

    Anonymous
    • Offline

    Would anybody be kind enough to post the birdeye perspective by Samuel Byron. In addition to the full Library Square I think it contained a few speculated buildings which were never built.

    Thanks

    #801725

    Anonymous
    • Offline

    Hey Gang

    I have just been leafing through a copy of “Dublin – A Grand Tour” (Jacqueline O’Brien/Desmond Guinness) which I found in my parents house. There were a few pieces of Information which I hadn’t heard before.

    Firstly, the present Dining Hall is actually the second design executed by Hugh Darley. The original plan, designed by Richard Cassels was abandoned after no less then two collapses during construction. Likewise, Cassels designed a monumental spire and Classical frontage for the Chapel which proved unstable and had to be demolished, probably replaced by the current Chapel (by Chambers/Myers). The spire is famous as it appears in numerous Eighteenth Century illustrations, most notably in in the painting of the Irish Volunteers rally on College Green, when it seems to loom over proceedings. Cassels run of bad luck continued when he designed a new West Front only for the commission to go to the amateur architect Theodore Jacobsen….unsurprising given Cassels less the stellar history where Trinity is concerned! Intriguingly, Jacobsen intended to have the College Green Facade surmounted by a large central Dome over the entrance flanked by cupolas at each end. Apparently, the Northern Cupola was actually constructed, but later dismantled. The planned Dome is the reason for some quirky internal divisions in the central block.

    Lastly, as we all know most of the oldest parts of Trinity pre-1700 do not survive. Including the original monastic buildings. However, looking at Charles Brookings “A Map of the City and Suburbs of Dublin” there is an illustration of “The front of the College” which shows a Classical Building I have never seen before. Certainly, more substantial then any depictions of the “old Trinity” I have seen previously.

    C

    #801726

    Anonymous
    • Offline

    The west front, as depicted by Brooking, has never received the attention it deserves, despite the fact that Trinity has an actual ‘History of Art and Architecture Dept.’

    The best publications dealing with the development of Trinity are;

    a slim pamphlet entitled, ‘The Buildings of Trinity College Dublin’ by McParland, reprinted from a Country Life article about 1980, and an up-date of this in another McParland publication called ‘The Public Architecture of Ireland’, or something very similar,

    and an article by Linzi Simpson in ‘Medieval Dublin XIII’ published in 2013.

    . . . but don’t expect to find too much discussion on the old west front.

Viewing 20 posts - 301 through 320 (of 323 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

Latest News