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  • #801448

    Anonymous

    Yes it would be great if some excavations could be carried out – a shame the opportunity doesn’t appear to have been taken back in the 1970s when much of the cobbling was relaid in Parliament Square.

    Some quick pictures of the scaffolding (taken before notjim’s, and some the same. Great minds etc).

    Big job.

    Also one of the many late 18th century windows to the rear (east) elevation that retains much of its original crown glass, none of which appears to survive on the main facade (not the best pic).

    Walking along in the evening is always best, as all of the shimmering panes in the shade catch the bright sky beautifully.
    Scaffolding is starting to go up at this side too.

    #801449

    Anonymous

    So the College has just applied for permission for the Digital Hub building, this will be a four story upwards extension of the Arts Building, on top of the Edmund Burke lecture theatre, that is, on your left as you enter the college from Nassau St, behind the 1937 Reading Room, which will be linked to it by an underground passage. The architects are Mc Cullough Mulvin.

    #801450

    Anonymous

    Just to show where the new building is to go, on top of Edmund Burke in the Arts Block on the left of the Nassau St entrance as you come in.

    It will be behind 1937 Reading Room and connected to it by an underground passage, I guess it will cease being a graduate library.

    #801451

    Anonymous

    “I guess it will cease being a graduate library.”

    That seems like a strange conclusion to reach, why do you say that? There is nothing in the site notice that suggests a change of use. Surely the new building would in some way be an extension of its functions if they are making a link to it.
    The position of the edmund burke theatre has always been a problem I think, it’s an obstacle without properly completing the square, it seems right (or logical) to build there. 4 average height stories would make it about the same height as the old library and probably below that of the arts building.

    #801452

    Anonymous

    Ok that was only a guess, but since they are building a corridor my guess is that they will include the Reading Room, either as an impressive seminar space.

    #801453

    Anonymous

    This has a planning number now
    4064/08
    so it is
    http://www.dublincity.ie/swiftlg/apas/run/WPHAPPDETAIL.DisplayUrl?theApnID=4064/08

    The documents aren’t scanned yet. Here is the site notice:

    PROTECTED STRUCTURE – The development comprises the construction of a new four storey over 2.1m high ground floor services undercroft Humanities Research building, named the ‘Long Room Hub’, (area 1309sqm) at the North side of the Arts Building (a Protected Structure) facing Fellows Square including minor alterations to two protected structures – the Arts Building and 1937 Reading Room.

    The Humanities Research building, of plan area 34m x 10.6m, will be finished in stonework and have rooflights projecting above a parapet level; it will be built above the Northern end of the Edmund Burke Theatre within the Arts Building complex and will overhang the northern, western and eastern edges of the single storey roof of the Edmund Burke Theatre, creating a services undercroft which will be enclosed at ground level to act as a service zone.

    Alterations to the Edmund Burke Theatre will comprise removal of the plantroom and associated parapet wall which project above the main Theatre roof level and their replacement with a new roof at a lower level to match the existing flat roof level of the Edmund Burke Theatre.

    The entrance level of the proposed Humanities Research Building will be approximately 2.1m above the current ground level of Fellows Square; the entrance level will be accessed by an open staircase and lift from Fellows Square; the overall height from ground level to parapet level including undercroft will be 16.25m.

    The development will include the construction of an underground corridor linking the proposed Humanities Research Building and the basement of the 1937 Reading Room (a protected structure), including associated openings required for access to the basement of the 1937 Reading Room; the underground corridor will be accessed through a new staircase at the west end of the Humanities Research Building.

    The development also comprises ancillary works including the development of a new garden on the roof of the Edmund Burke Theatre incorporating the removal of a planter box and the formation of a new door in the north facade of the main Arts Building at upper ground floor level to provide access to the proposed new building, routing of service cables from the proposed building to the existing centrally located Arts Building plant room at lower ground level and adjustments to existing below ground level fire escape staircases from the Edmund Burke Theatre to accommodate the new building.

    #801454

    Paul Clerkin
    Keymaster

    Still no sign of the documents online

    #801455

    Paul Clerkin
    Keymaster

    When are the docs for this going to appear online?

    Web Reference
    Application Date: 14-Aug-2008
    Last Date for Observations: 17-Sep-2008

    Today 28-August and no sign.
    Not that I’m appealing, I would like to see drawings for publication as a news item

    #801456

    Anonymous

    Apparently there’s one guy who does all the scanning, and if he’s not in, it doesn’t get done.

    #801457

    Anonymous

    @devin wrote:

    Apparently there’s one guy who does all the scanning, and if he’s not in, it doesn’t get done.

    What? That’s madness.

    The DCC website seems to have really deteriorated again in recent months – are other people finding this, or is it just certain browsers?

    #801458

    Anonymous

    @hutton wrote:

    The DCC website seems to have really deteriorated again in recent months – are other people finding this, or is it just certain browsers?

    I find it painfully slow most of the time, but as you say, it could be just certain browsers. I still prefer to go into the counter whenever possible, use their ink etc.

    #801459

    Anonymous

    4064/08

    nice new model at DCC McCullough Mulvin Architects

    #801460

    Anonymous

    Thanks for posting that missarchi! I guess it is almost predictable, a Mc Cullough Mulvin building with those modish tall and thin irregularly spaced windows. I am surprised though by how separate from the arts building it is, it doesn’t look like it impinges on the figurative beyond the first step; it is narrower than I expected.

    I amn’t sure if I like it or not; it would be great to hear views from those who are better at reading models.

    #801461

    Anonymous

    no students in the afternoon sun infront of the book of kells

    #801462

    Anonymous

    @notjim wrote:

    I guess it is almost predictable, a Mc Cullough Mulvin building with those modish tall and thin irregularly spaced windows. .

    It looks like a dead ringer for Grafton’s Merrion Row building, especially the Hugenot Cemetry elevation! It’s hard to tell from the model (still no documents scaned up on the DCC web site), but I imagine the finish is stone here also.

    The building looks like it’s been designed to fill out the gap between the the west end of the Library and the east elevation of the Exam Hall, above the reading room, when viewed from the main square, which is a brave move that may not please tradionalists and film-set location finders.

    Having a narrow, stand alone, frontage to Fellows’ Square will give it an ‘object in the space’ quality rather than a ‘termination of the space’ quality, which may have been the only option, given the presence of the Reading Room at this end of the square.

    As an object, it does look pretty crisp and clean. I wouldn’t fault it for being a cousin of the Grafton building, (and their own Lincoln Place in-fill), that’s how tradition works, so long as it’s an advance and a refinement of these precedents and not just a piece of formula.

    McCullough Mulvin have written the book on urban Dublin and the loss of tradition, so they should be a safe pair of hands for this kind of thing.

    p.s. notjim: You could do worse than keep them in mind for the professorship when, as one of your first acts as provost, you create a faculty of architecture in Trinity, now that every regional Tech. seems to have one,
    that is, after gunter naturally.

    #801463

    Anonymous

    It is very much in the idiom of the above mentioned buildings, including the carved out entrance portal. The random window theme, while now commonplace, holds a particular resonance in the midst of ranks of classically ordered fenestration and is thus apt in this context. As such I think the building has the potential to work quite well. Presumably limestone will be used as cladding – a nice bit of muddy Dublin Calp one thinks will not find favour.

    Of perhaps greater interest the positioning, where it would appear to advance beyond the building line of the Old Library. Is this Berkeley vs Museum Round II? I don’t see the justification for this, both relative to the Old Library, and the new building’s wider relationship with the square, into which it seems to want to injerject rather than act as a foil to.

    #801464

    Anonymous

    McCullough Mulvin have been playing with this language for a while now, long before Merrion Row – just looking through their website – Lincoln place for a start, Oakpark (rather obscure project), Freiburg library competition, Digital Hub and Newmarket framework plans, etc. One would expect that they have refined this typology by now, there does infact appear to be a strong rhythm to the facade, not as rigid as the grafton exercise, but certinally not “irregularly spaced windows”.
    The presence of the reading room is somewhat problematic, it negates the possibility of ever terminating that space correctly, I fail to see the value of it, it was built at the same time as Corbu was doing his thing, and used much of the same technology, and is only in the region of 30years older than the arts block. Yet it looks old, so apparently that’s enough to warrent protecting it. It looks good to the tourists I suppose. However given that it is there and won’t be moving anytime soon, the “object in space” appears to be the only way to sucessfully treat any new intervention there.

    #801465

    Paul Clerkin
    Keymaster

    Agreed – it would have been interesting if the reading room was removed – it would have allowed for the insertion of a modern building into Parliament Square. After all it’s a lovely mixture of architecture and styles from the west front, to Chambers work, Lanyon’s campanile, the Library, and the Rubics and Graduates building. A new instertion from McCullough Mulvin, whom I’m personally a great fan of, would have been an exciting concept. It would also have created a really nice collection of buildings on the Nassau Street side of the library – the Arts block, ABK’s library, Burgh’s Library and the new building.
    A chance lost.

    #801466

    Anonymous

    I have to say I’d hate to see the 37 removed.

    I agree with Graham’s concerns regarding the positioning.

    I grabbed the attached image from the excellent bird’s eye view on maps.live.com and as you can see the 37 is quite carefully positioned.

    However the line it establishes in the direction of Nassau St. is broken by that bit sticking out of the arts block. Strangely this small part of the arts block seems to deliberately mirror the distinctive shape of the 37 while lopsidedly ignoring it’s position. Maybe it’s just an accident of the perspective.

    I would prefer to see an attempt to try to reinforce the 37’s line back to the arts block attempting to complete the rectangle. It would require removing that bit of the arts block but from the photo of the model it looks like the proposal involves this anyway.

    I’m sure a reconfiguration like this would not require any reduction in the amount of floor space created by the new building.

    #801467

    Anonymous

    I can’t say I share the concerns about the positioning, look at the above aerial view: the front line of the exam hall relative to the library and to the reading room; nothing lines up. The character of trinity’s spaces is of regular, symmetric buildings placed somewhat irregularly that describe a square, without emphatically being a square, the overlapping of the buildings sets up the compression and release between and the diagonal views across them: refer to the image posed on the previous page of this thread by cestiphon looking at the corner of the library between the museum building and the berkeley. The new building appears to hold the line of the arts building which it belongs more to, than to the 1937.

  • Author
    Posts
  • #801448

    Anonymous
    • Offline

    Yes it would be great if some excavations could be carried out – a shame the opportunity doesn’t appear to have been taken back in the 1970s when much of the cobbling was relaid in Parliament Square.

    Some quick pictures of the scaffolding (taken before notjim’s, and some the same. Great minds etc).

    Big job.

    Also one of the many late 18th century windows to the rear (east) elevation that retains much of its original crown glass, none of which appears to survive on the main facade (not the best pic).

    Walking along in the evening is always best, as all of the shimmering panes in the shade catch the bright sky beautifully.
    Scaffolding is starting to go up at this side too.

    #801449

    Anonymous
    • Offline

    So the College has just applied for permission for the Digital Hub building, this will be a four story upwards extension of the Arts Building, on top of the Edmund Burke lecture theatre, that is, on your left as you enter the college from Nassau St, behind the 1937 Reading Room, which will be linked to it by an underground passage. The architects are Mc Cullough Mulvin.

    #801450

    Anonymous
    • Offline

    Just to show where the new building is to go, on top of Edmund Burke in the Arts Block on the left of the Nassau St entrance as you come in.

    It will be behind 1937 Reading Room and connected to it by an underground passage, I guess it will cease being a graduate library.

    #801451

    Anonymous
    • Offline

    “I guess it will cease being a graduate library.”

    That seems like a strange conclusion to reach, why do you say that? There is nothing in the site notice that suggests a change of use. Surely the new building would in some way be an extension of its functions if they are making a link to it.
    The position of the edmund burke theatre has always been a problem I think, it’s an obstacle without properly completing the square, it seems right (or logical) to build there. 4 average height stories would make it about the same height as the old library and probably below that of the arts building.

    #801452

    Anonymous
    • Offline

    Ok that was only a guess, but since they are building a corridor my guess is that they will include the Reading Room, either as an impressive seminar space.

    #801453

    Anonymous
    • Offline

    This has a planning number now
    4064/08
    so it is
    http://www.dublincity.ie/swiftlg/apas/run/WPHAPPDETAIL.DisplayUrl?theApnID=4064/08

    The documents aren’t scanned yet. Here is the site notice:

    PROTECTED STRUCTURE – The development comprises the construction of a new four storey over 2.1m high ground floor services undercroft Humanities Research building, named the ‘Long Room Hub’, (area 1309sqm) at the North side of the Arts Building (a Protected Structure) facing Fellows Square including minor alterations to two protected structures – the Arts Building and 1937 Reading Room.

    The Humanities Research building, of plan area 34m x 10.6m, will be finished in stonework and have rooflights projecting above a parapet level; it will be built above the Northern end of the Edmund Burke Theatre within the Arts Building complex and will overhang the northern, western and eastern edges of the single storey roof of the Edmund Burke Theatre, creating a services undercroft which will be enclosed at ground level to act as a service zone.

    Alterations to the Edmund Burke Theatre will comprise removal of the plantroom and associated parapet wall which project above the main Theatre roof level and their replacement with a new roof at a lower level to match the existing flat roof level of the Edmund Burke Theatre.

    The entrance level of the proposed Humanities Research Building will be approximately 2.1m above the current ground level of Fellows Square; the entrance level will be accessed by an open staircase and lift from Fellows Square; the overall height from ground level to parapet level including undercroft will be 16.25m.

    The development will include the construction of an underground corridor linking the proposed Humanities Research Building and the basement of the 1937 Reading Room (a protected structure), including associated openings required for access to the basement of the 1937 Reading Room; the underground corridor will be accessed through a new staircase at the west end of the Humanities Research Building.

    The development also comprises ancillary works including the development of a new garden on the roof of the Edmund Burke Theatre incorporating the removal of a planter box and the formation of a new door in the north facade of the main Arts Building at upper ground floor level to provide access to the proposed new building, routing of service cables from the proposed building to the existing centrally located Arts Building plant room at lower ground level and adjustments to existing below ground level fire escape staircases from the Edmund Burke Theatre to accommodate the new building.

    #801454

    Paul Clerkin
    Keymaster
    • Offline

    Still no sign of the documents online

    #801455

    Paul Clerkin
    Keymaster
    • Offline

    When are the docs for this going to appear online?

    Web Reference
    Application Date: 14-Aug-2008
    Last Date for Observations: 17-Sep-2008

    Today 28-August and no sign.
    Not that I’m appealing, I would like to see drawings for publication as a news item

    #801456

    Anonymous
    • Offline

    Apparently there’s one guy who does all the scanning, and if he’s not in, it doesn’t get done.

    #801457

    Anonymous
    • Offline

    @devin wrote:

    Apparently there’s one guy who does all the scanning, and if he’s not in, it doesn’t get done.

    What? That’s madness.

    The DCC website seems to have really deteriorated again in recent months – are other people finding this, or is it just certain browsers?

    #801458

    Anonymous
    • Offline

    @hutton wrote:

    The DCC website seems to have really deteriorated again in recent months – are other people finding this, or is it just certain browsers?

    I find it painfully slow most of the time, but as you say, it could be just certain browsers. I still prefer to go into the counter whenever possible, use their ink etc.

    #801459

    Anonymous
    • Offline

    4064/08

    nice new model at DCC McCullough Mulvin Architects

    #801460

    Anonymous
    • Offline

    Thanks for posting that missarchi! I guess it is almost predictable, a Mc Cullough Mulvin building with those modish tall and thin irregularly spaced windows. I am surprised though by how separate from the arts building it is, it doesn’t look like it impinges on the figurative beyond the first step; it is narrower than I expected.

    I amn’t sure if I like it or not; it would be great to hear views from those who are better at reading models.

    #801461

    Anonymous
    • Offline

    no students in the afternoon sun infront of the book of kells

    #801462

    Anonymous
    • Offline

    @notjim wrote:

    I guess it is almost predictable, a Mc Cullough Mulvin building with those modish tall and thin irregularly spaced windows. .

    It looks like a dead ringer for Grafton’s Merrion Row building, especially the Hugenot Cemetry elevation! It’s hard to tell from the model (still no documents scaned up on the DCC web site), but I imagine the finish is stone here also.

    The building looks like it’s been designed to fill out the gap between the the west end of the Library and the east elevation of the Exam Hall, above the reading room, when viewed from the main square, which is a brave move that may not please tradionalists and film-set location finders.

    Having a narrow, stand alone, frontage to Fellows’ Square will give it an ‘object in the space’ quality rather than a ‘termination of the space’ quality, which may have been the only option, given the presence of the Reading Room at this end of the square.

    As an object, it does look pretty crisp and clean. I wouldn’t fault it for being a cousin of the Grafton building, (and their own Lincoln Place in-fill), that’s how tradition works, so long as it’s an advance and a refinement of these precedents and not just a piece of formula.

    McCullough Mulvin have written the book on urban Dublin and the loss of tradition, so they should be a safe pair of hands for this kind of thing.

    p.s. notjim: You could do worse than keep them in mind for the professorship when, as one of your first acts as provost, you create a faculty of architecture in Trinity, now that every regional Tech. seems to have one,
    that is, after gunter naturally.

    #801463

    Anonymous
    • Offline

    It is very much in the idiom of the above mentioned buildings, including the carved out entrance portal. The random window theme, while now commonplace, holds a particular resonance in the midst of ranks of classically ordered fenestration and is thus apt in this context. As such I think the building has the potential to work quite well. Presumably limestone will be used as cladding – a nice bit of muddy Dublin Calp one thinks will not find favour.

    Of perhaps greater interest the positioning, where it would appear to advance beyond the building line of the Old Library. Is this Berkeley vs Museum Round II? I don’t see the justification for this, both relative to the Old Library, and the new building’s wider relationship with the square, into which it seems to want to injerject rather than act as a foil to.

    #801464

    Anonymous
    • Offline

    McCullough Mulvin have been playing with this language for a while now, long before Merrion Row – just looking through their website – Lincoln place for a start, Oakpark (rather obscure project), Freiburg library competition, Digital Hub and Newmarket framework plans, etc. One would expect that they have refined this typology by now, there does infact appear to be a strong rhythm to the facade, not as rigid as the grafton exercise, but certinally not “irregularly spaced windows”.
    The presence of the reading room is somewhat problematic, it negates the possibility of ever terminating that space correctly, I fail to see the value of it, it was built at the same time as Corbu was doing his thing, and used much of the same technology, and is only in the region of 30years older than the arts block. Yet it looks old, so apparently that’s enough to warrent protecting it. It looks good to the tourists I suppose. However given that it is there and won’t be moving anytime soon, the “object in space” appears to be the only way to sucessfully treat any new intervention there.

    #801465

    Paul Clerkin
    Keymaster
    • Offline

    Agreed – it would have been interesting if the reading room was removed – it would have allowed for the insertion of a modern building into Parliament Square. After all it’s a lovely mixture of architecture and styles from the west front, to Chambers work, Lanyon’s campanile, the Library, and the Rubics and Graduates building. A new instertion from McCullough Mulvin, whom I’m personally a great fan of, would have been an exciting concept. It would also have created a really nice collection of buildings on the Nassau Street side of the library – the Arts block, ABK’s library, Burgh’s Library and the new building.
    A chance lost.

    #801466

    Anonymous
    • Offline

    I have to say I’d hate to see the 37 removed.

    I agree with Graham’s concerns regarding the positioning.

    I grabbed the attached image from the excellent bird’s eye view on maps.live.com and as you can see the 37 is quite carefully positioned.

    However the line it establishes in the direction of Nassau St. is broken by that bit sticking out of the arts block. Strangely this small part of the arts block seems to deliberately mirror the distinctive shape of the 37 while lopsidedly ignoring it’s position. Maybe it’s just an accident of the perspective.

    I would prefer to see an attempt to try to reinforce the 37’s line back to the arts block attempting to complete the rectangle. It would require removing that bit of the arts block but from the photo of the model it looks like the proposal involves this anyway.

    I’m sure a reconfiguration like this would not require any reduction in the amount of floor space created by the new building.

    #801467

    Anonymous
    • Offline

    I can’t say I share the concerns about the positioning, look at the above aerial view: the front line of the exam hall relative to the library and to the reading room; nothing lines up. The character of trinity’s spaces is of regular, symmetric buildings placed somewhat irregularly that describe a square, without emphatically being a square, the overlapping of the buildings sets up the compression and release between and the diagonal views across them: refer to the image posed on the previous page of this thread by cestiphon looking at the corner of the library between the museum building and the berkeley. The new building appears to hold the line of the arts building which it belongs more to, than to the 1937.

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