Twitter Facebook Vimeo Youtube Google Plus Pinterest Tumblr

Dublin

19 February 2010

1810 – Baggot Street, Dublin

Baggot Street is named after Robert, Lord Bagod who was given the Manor of Rath in the 13th century. Baggot Rath castle stood at what is now the junction of Waterloo Road and...

19 February 2010

1895 – Upper Baggot Street, Dublin

One side of Upper Baggot Street has been mostly rebuilt or a mixture of architectural periods. The northern side of the street is a fairly unified Victorian streetscape with some fine shopfronts and...

19 February 2010

1827 – Mercy International Centre, Baggot Street, Dublin

Architect: John B. Keane In 1824, with the blessing of Dublin’s Archbishop Daniel Murray, Catherine McAuley bought land on Lower Baggot Street, and built a home for unemployed girls, homeless children and the...

19 February 2010

1919 – Permanent TSB Bank, Upper Baggot Street, Dublin

Architect: Fuller & Jermyn Fine ornate bank at the start to the largely Victorian streetscape of Upper Baggot Street. Constructed as a public house. Originally two different buildings, the building has good quality...

19 February 2010

1916 – Bridge building, Upper Baggot Street, Dublin

Architect: T.F. McNamara Former bank and office building on the bank of the Grand Canal. Most noticeable for the large windows on all floors and the gable chimney which appears to be supported...

19 February 2010

1893 – Royal City of Dublin Hospital, Upper Baggot Street, Dublin

Architect: Albert E. Murray Much of Upper Baggot Street was built in the Victorian era as a mixture of commercial premises, office accommodation and residential. Punctuating one side is the fine brick and...

19 February 2010

1962 – Bord Failte, Baggot Street, Dublin

Architect: Scott Tallon Walker Designed to cost as little as possible, the headquarters of Bord Failte (Irish Tourist Board) occupies a very important site at the Baggot Street crossing of the Grand Canal....

19 February 2010

1978 – Bank of Ireland, Baggot Street, Dublin

Architect: Scott Tallon Walker The Bank of Ireland in Baggot Street is most notable for two things other than its architecture: the amount or Bronze Manganese used in its construction – a commonly...

19 February 2010

1978 – O2 (Formerly Bord na Mona), Baggot Street, Dublin

Architect: Stephenson Gibney & Associates Designed as the headquarters of Bord Na Mona, and now the head office in Ireland of mobile operator O2. This is a good example of modern architecture in...


Skip to toolbar