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Robinson & Keefe

27 February 2014

1938 – Irish Sweepstakes Building, Ballsbridge, Co. Dublin

Architect: Robinson & Keefe Office complex built in 1937-38 as the administration centre of the world wide business (and possibly world wide con job) that was the Irish Sweepstakes. Constructed after the previous...

26 April 2012

1936 – Technical School, Fairview, Dublin

Architect: Robinson & Keefe Now with an added level, the Technical School by Robinson & Keefe has some slight Art Deco touches. The building has a lovely gradual curve following the curvature of...

09 April 2010

1939 – DIT Cathal Brugha Street, Dublin

Architect: Robinson Keefe Built as the College of Domestic Economy for the City of Dublin Vocational Education Committee and now a part of DIT. It has an excellent Art Deco entrance hallway. The...

07 April 2010

1932 – Former Carlton Cinema, O’Connell Street, Dublin

Architect: Robinson Keefe One of Dublin’s finest Art Deco facades, the former Carlton Cinema has been closed for over a decade and is not awaiting demolition. A proposal to move the facade is...

19 February 2010

1931 – No.52 Grafton Street, Dublin

Architect: Robinson Keefe An unusual corner building at the top of Grafton Street complete with modern interpretation of the corner towers used on many Dublin corners. Known as Noblett’s Sweet Shop for many...

17 February 2010

1928 – Dublin Gas Company, D’Olier Street, Dublin

Architect: Robinson Keefe The former headquarters of the Dublin Gas Company (built in 1928) has two facades with two different architectural styles. The main facade onto D’Olier Street is Art Deco with a...

30 December 2009

1965 – Cathedral of Our Lady Assumed into Heaven and St Nicholas, Galway

Architect: Robinson Keefe The last large Roman Catholic cathedral to be built in Ireland, and quite possibly the oddest in design. With Spanish overtones, and constructed in limestone, the cathedral is a weird...

06 June 2009

John J. Robinson

Initially studied for the Ministry before turning to architecture and being apprenticed to George O’Connor. He worked in London with Leonard Stokes until returning to Dublin in 1913. Entered into partnership with R....